The Library of Congress > Linked Data Service > LC Demographic Group Terms (LCDGT)

Pi pa players


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    • Chinese lute players
    • Pipa players
    • Pipaists
  • Broader Terms

  • Sources

    • found: Work cat.: Wong, Samuel Shengmiao. Impressions of a pipa player, 2003:pref. ("As a performer, I have been asked numerous times if there was a resource for the pipa in English ... I decided to write it in the form of profiles of different pipa players ... I explained the pipa's techniques, concepts and playing methods, in the form of my life story, meanwhile interjecting interviews of renowned pipa players around the world") p. 209 (Samuel Wong Shengmiao; he only found his true calling when he received his primary education in the pipa at the age of 13; since then he has progressed slowly, playing in numerous performances at home and abroud; in 2000 he won the National Arts Council's National Chinese Music Competition (Pipa Intermediate Category); in 2002 he won the National Arts Council's National Chinese Music Competition (Pipa Senior Category)) unnumb. prelim. p. ("The pipa is one of the most expressive Chinese instruments ... Of all the plucked-string instruments, it has the widest range of expression")
    • found: Wikipedia, Feb. 22, 2017:Pipa (The pipa (Chinese: 琵琶 = pi pa) is a four-stringed Chinese musical instrument, belonging to the plucked category of instruments. Sometimes called the Chinese lute, the instrument has a pear-shaped wooden body with a varying number of frets ranging from 12 to 26. Another Chinese four-string plucked lute is the liuqin, which looks like a smaller version of the pipa)
    • found: Grove music online, Feb. 22, 2017(Pipa. Pear-shaped plucked lute of China and Korea. It corresponds to the Japanese Biwa and is related to the Vietnamese đàn ty ba; The archetype of the modern pipa, which has a pear-shaped soundbox, was introduced into China from India in 346–53 CE, but its origin was in ancient Persia; After the Tang dynasty the instrument commonly known as pipa was the four-string quxiang pipa. Gradual changes occurred throughout the succeeding millennium: the playing position changed from horizontal to vertical; fingernails, real or false, replaced the plectrum; the number of frets increased from 4 to 14 or 16, and in the 20th century to 17, 24, 29 or 30; There were two types of pip’a in Korea, both now obsolete: the four-string tang-pip’a ('Chinese pip’a') and the five-string hyang-pip’a ('native pip’a', also known as ohyŏn: 'five strings').)
    • found: The Oxford companion to music, via Oxford music online, Feb. 22, 2017(pipa. Chinese short-necked four-string lute)
    • found: YouTube website, Feb. 22, 2017(pipaist Zhou Yi; pipa soloist Zhou Yi)
    • found: Myers, J. The way of the pipa, ©1992:p. 9 (players of the pipa) p. 22 (pipa players) p. 29 (Shanghai remains the geographic center of what is now an international community of pipaists)
    • found: LCMPT, May 8, 2017:(pi pa; UFs pipa; Chinese lute; BT plucked lute)
  • Change Notes

    • 2017-02-22: new
    • 2017-06-08: revised
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