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Fables


  • Stories intended to teach moral lessons, and whose main characters are generally animals or inanimate objects that speak and act like human beings. For short, simple stories that convey a moral lesson, and whose main characters are generally humans, see [Parables.]

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  • Instance Of

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  • Form

    • Fables
  • Variants

    • Cautionary tales
    • Fabular tales
    • Moral and philosophical tales
    • Morality tales
    • Philosophical and moral tales
  • Broader Terms

  • Closely Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Sources

    • found: Wheeler, K. Parables and fables : from symbolism to allegory?, via WWW, Apr. 4, 2013(A fable is also a brief story illustrating a moral. Unlike the parables, fables often include talking animals or animated objects as the principal characters. The interaction of these animals or inanimate things reveals general truths about human nature, i.e., a person can learn practical lessons from the fictional antics in a fable. However, the lesson learned is not allegorical. Each animal is not necessarily a symbol for something else. Instead, the reader learns the lesson as an exemplum--an example of what one should or should not do.)
    • found: Merriam Webster's encyclopedia of literature, 1995(Fable. A narration intended to enforce a useful truth; especially, one in which animals or inanimate objects speak and act like human beings. The Fable differs from the ordinary folktale in that it has a moral that is woven into the story and often explicitly formulated at the end.)
    • found: Quinn, E. A dictionary of literary and thematic terms, c1999(Fable: A short narrative in prose or verse in which the action of the characters, usually animals, conveys a moral lesson.)
    • found: Baldick, C. The Oxford dictionary of literary terms, 2008(Fable: A brief tale in verse or prose that conveys a moral lesson, usually by giving human speech and manners to animals and inanimate things. Fables often conclude with a moral, delivered on the form of an epigram. A very old form of story related to folklore and proverbs, the fable in Europe descends from tales attributed to Aesop)
    • found: LCSH, Oct. 22, 2014(Fables. BT Exempla; Fiction)
    • found: GSAFD, 2000(Fables. UF Cautionary tales and verse, Moral and philosophical stories, Morality tales.)
    • found: Looking with Robert Gardner, 2016:p. 204 (fabular tales of high school life)
    • found: Historicizing emotions, 2018:p. 299 (fabular tales of sacrifice and loss among friends)
    • found: Merriam-Webster dictionary online, Nov. 14, 2018(fabular: of, relating to, or having the form of a fable; fable: a fictitious narrative or statement: such as a) a legendary story of supernatural happenings b) a narration intended to enforce a useful truth, especially : one in which animals speak and act like human beings c) falsehood, lie)
  • General Notes

    • Stories intended to teach moral lessons, and whose main characters are generally animals or inanimate objects that speak and act like human beings. For short, simple stories that convey a moral lesson, and whose main characters are generally humans, see [Parables.]
  • Example Notes

    • Note under [Parables]
  • Change Notes

    • 2014-12-01: new
    • 2019-02-21: revised
  • Alternate Formats

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