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Parables


  • Short, simple stories that convey a moral lesson, and whose main characters are generally humans. For stories intended to teach moral lessons, and whose main characters are generally animals or inanimate objects that speak and act like human beings, see [Fables.]

  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Form

    • Parables
  • Variants

    • Parabolic stories
  • Broader Terms

  • Related Terms

  • Closely Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Sources

    • found: Quinn, E. A dictionary of literary and thematic terms, c1999(parable. A tale designed to teach a moral lesson. Usually, as in the parables of Jesus in the New Testament, the story involves human beings whose actions are clarified by the concluding moral. The parable differs from allegory, in which the characters represent abstract qualities, and from fable, in which the moral is unstated because it is presumed to be self-evident.)
    • found: OED online, viewed Sept. 19, 2014(parable (2a): A (usually realistic) story or narrative told to convey a moral or spiritual lesson or insight; esp. one told by Jesus in the Gospels. (Now the usual sense))
    • found: Baldick, C. The Oxford dict. of literary terms, 2008(parable. A brief tale intended to be understood as an allegory illustrating some lesson or moral. Adjective: parabolic. See also Fable)
    • found: Genre terms : a thesaurus for use in rare book and special collections cataloging, via WWW, July 17, 2014(Parables. Use for short, fictitious stories making comparisons from which moral or spiritual truths are drawn)
    • found: Wikipedia, May 29, 2013:Parable (A parable is a succinct story, in prose or verse, which illustrates one or more instructive principles, or lessons, or (sometimes) a normative principle. It differs from a fable in that fables use animals, plants, inanimate objects, and forces of nature as characters, while parables generally feature human characters. A parable is a short tale that illustrates universal truth, one of the simplest of narratives. It sketches a setting, describes an action, and shows the results)
    • found: Lyke, L.L. King David and the wise woman of Tekoa : the resonance of tradition in parabolic narrative, c1997.
    • found: City Pastor. Parables and parabolic stories, 1829.
    • found: Wheeler, K. Parables and fables : from symbolism to allegory?, via WWW, Nov. 14, 2018(In common parlance, a parable is a story or short narrative designed to reveal allegorically some religious principle, moral lesson, psychological reality, or general truth. Rather than using abstract discussion, a parable always teaches by comparison with real or literal occurrences--especially "homey" everyday occurrences a wide number of people can relate to; A fable is also a brief story illustrating a moral. Unlike the parables, fables often include talking animals or animated objects as the principal characters. The interaction of these animals or inanimate things reveals general truths about human nature, i.e., a person can learn practical lessons from the fictional antics in a fable. However, the lesson learned is not allegorical. Each animal is not necessarily a symbol for something else. Instead, the reader learns the lesson as an exemplum--an example of what one should or should not do)
  • General Notes

    • Short, simple stories that convey a moral lesson, and whose main characters are generally humans. For stories intended to teach moral lessons, and whose main characters are generally animals or inanimate objects that speak and act like human beings, see [Fables.]
  • Example Notes

    • Note under [Fables]
  • Change Notes

    • 2014-12-01: new
    • 2019-02-21: revised
  • Alternate Formats

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