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Tijuana bibles


  • Small, oblong pornographic comics clandestinely published in the United States between the 1920s and 1960s that usually parodied popular newspaper comic strip characters or celebrities.

  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Form

    • Tijuana bibles
  • Variants

    • Bibles, Tijuana
    • Bluesies (Tijuana bibles)
    • Eight-pagers (Tijuana bibles)
    • Gray-backs (Tijuana bibles)
    • Jiggs-and-Maggie books
    • Jo-jo books
    • Sixteen-pagers (Tijuana bibles)
    • Tillie & Mac books
    • Tillie-and-Mac books
    • Two-by-fours (Tijuana bibles)
  • Broader Terms

  • Closely Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Sources

    • found: Genre terms : a thesaurus for use in rare book and special collections cataloging, via WWW, Dec. 5, 2012(Tijuana bibles. Use for small, oblong comic books, clandestinely published in the U.S. between the 1930s and 1950s and parodying figures of popular culture in explicit sexual situations. UF Bluesies; Eight-pagers; Sixteen-pagers. BT Comic books)
    • found: Wikipedia, Dec. 4, 2012(Tijuana bible. Tijuana bibles (also known as eight-pagers, bluesies, gray-backs, Jiggs-and-Maggie books, jo-jo books, Tillie-and-Mac books, and two-by-fours) were little pornographic comic books produced in the United States from the 1920s to the early 1960s. Their popularity peaked during the Great Depression era. The typical "bible" was an eight-panel comic strip in a wallet-size 2.5x4 inch format (approximately 7x10.5 cm) with black print on cheap white paper and running eight pages in length. Illegal, clandestine, and anonymous, the artists, writers, and publishers of these booklets are generally unknown. Most Tijuana bibles were obscene parodies of popular newspaper comic strips of the day, like "Blondie", "Barney Google", "Moon Mullins", "Popeye", "Tillie the Toiler", "Dick Tracy", "Little Orphan Annie", "Bringing Up Father", "Dixie Dugan", and "Mutt and Jeff". Others made use of characters based on popular movie stars and sports stars of the day, like Mae West and Joe Louis, sometimes with names thinly changed to (presumably) avoid libel. Before the war almost all the stories were humorous and frequently were cartoon versions of well-known dirty jokes that had been making the rounds for decades.)
  • General Notes

    • Small, oblong pornographic comics clandestinely published in the United States between the 1920s and 1960s that usually parodied popular newspaper comic strip characters or celebrities.
  • Change Notes

    • 2014-12-01: new
    • 2015-12-22: revised
  • Alternate Formats

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