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Cootie catchers


  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Form

    • Cootie catchers
  • Variants

    • Chatterboxes (Cootie catchers)
    • Fortune tellers (Cootie catchers)
    • Fortunetellers (Cootie catchers)
    • Origami cootie catchers
    • Origami fortune tellers
    • Origami fortunetellers
    • Paku-pakus (Cootie catchers)
    • Paper fortune tellers
    • Paper fortunetellers
    • Salt cellars (Cootie catchers)
    • Whirlybirds (Cootie catchers)
  • Broader Terms

  • Sources

    • found: Work cat.: Hiebert, Helen. Vertices, 2016(an artist's book consisting of 1 volume + 1 sheet + 1 cootie catcher) colophon ("There are four components: 1. The house shaped book 'Vertices' featuring the poem 'Vertex' by Sarah Kathryn Moore, inkjet printed on artist-made abaca paper which is laminated to artist-made cotton paper with hand-cut windows. 2. 'Love in a maze,' a watermark print in an artist-made cotton/abaca blend paper. 3. The 'Fortune teller,' an origami game featuring pulp printed symbols and hand stitched text representing potential outcomes of perhaps the most consequential intersection of male & female. 4. The envelope also features pulp printed symbols and is folded from an artist-made cotton/abaca blend paper to house the first three components.")
    • found: Elliott, Steven. Cootie catcher : your own personal fortune teller, ©1999(Consists of a single sheet folded and refolded again so that the four exterior flaps, bearing text, may be opened at random to reveal one's fortune in the format called a cootie catcher)
    • found: 98206160: The cootie catcher book, ©1997:cover (tear-'em-out, fold-'em-up, fortune tellers)
    • found: LCSH, Oct. 7, 2018(Cootie catchers. UF Catchers, Cootie; Fortune tellers (Paper work); Origami cootie catchers. BT Paper work)
    • found: Schneider, C. A brief history of cootie catchers, 2015, via WWW, Oct. 7, 2018(cootie catcher; centuries-old origami performed by kids (usually); the fortune teller also goes by chatterbox, whirlybird, or salt cellar, and that last name is actually reflective of how the origami figure was first introduced to the United States; by the 1950s, cootie catchers had started to appear in England and the United States, and propagated from there. Today, the game is played all over the world, and each place has its own name for the fortune teller)
    • found: Wiktionary, Oct. 7, 2018(cootie catcher (plural cootie catchers): A form of origami with hidden fortunes, activities, etc., written on the folds, and used mainly in children's games, where a person is asked to choose a fold to open. Synonyms: chatterbox, fortuneteller)
    • found: Wikipedia, Oct. 7, 2018:Paper fortune teller (A fortune teller (also called a cootie catcher, chatterbox, salt cellar, whirlybird, or paku-paku) is a form of origami used in children's games. Parts of the fortune teller are labelled with colors or numbers that serve as options for a player to choose from, and on the inside are eight flaps, each concealing a message. The person operating the fortune teller manipulates the device based on the choices made by the player, and finally one of the hidden messages is revealed. These messages may purport to answer questions (hence the name) or they may be activities that the player must perform.)
    • found: Origami-Instructions.com, Oct. 7, 2018:origami for kids > fortune teller (origami fortune teller)
    • found: Teaching literacy in the digital age, 2014:p. 104 (origami fortuneteller; fortuneteller)
  • Change Notes

    • 2018-10-08: new
    • 2019-01-24: revised
  • Alternate Formats

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