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From Library of Congress Name Authority File


Williams, Ted, 1918-2002


  • [Theodore Samuel "Ted" Williams (August 30, 1918-July 5, 2002) was an American professional baseball player and manager. He played his entire 22-year Major League Baseball career as the left fielder for the Boston Red Sox (1939-1942 and 1946-1960). Williams was a two-time American League Most Valuable Player (MVP) winner, led the league in batting six times, and won the Triple Crown twice. A 19-time All-Star, he had a career batting average of .344 with 521 home runs, and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1966. Williams recorded a hit 34 percent of the time; he reached base an astounding 48 percent of the time. Williams was the last player in Major League Baseball to bat over .400 in a single season (.406 in 1941). Williams holds the highest career batting average of anyone with 500 or more home runs. His best year was 1941, when he hit .406 with 37 HR, 120 RBI, and 135 runs scored. His .553 on base percentage set a record that stood for 61 years.] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_Williams
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  • Variants

    • us: Splinter (Baseball player), 1918-2002
    • us: Kid (Baseball player), 1918-2002
    • us: Splendid Splinter (Baseball player) , 1918-2002
    • us: Eternal Kid (Baseball player), 1918-2002
    • us: Teddy Ballgame (Baseball player), 1918-2002
    • us: Williams, Theodore Samuel, 1918-2002
    • us: Williams, Teddy Samuel, 1918-2002
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  • Sources

    • found: Sampson, A. Ted Williams, 1950.
    • found: Wikipedia WWW site, Apr. 3, 2006(under Ted Williams: Theodore Samuel Williams; b. Teddy Samuel Williams, Aug. 30, 1918, San Diego; d. July 5, 2002, Crystal River, Fla.; American left fielder in Major League Baseball who played 19 seasons, twice interrupted by military service as a Marine Corps pilot, with the Boston Red Sox; it has been argued that he was the greatest hitter in the history of baseball)
    • found: Williams, T. Teddy Ballgame: my life in pictures, c2002t.p. (Teddy Ballgame)
    • found: National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum WWW site, June 8, 2011:Ted Williams entry (Theodore Samuel Williams; inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum in 1966) - http://baseballhall.org/hof/williams-ted
  • General Notes

    • [Theodore Samuel "Ted" Williams (August 30, 1918-July 5, 2002) was an American professional baseball player and manager. He played his entire 22-year Major League Baseball career as the left fielder for the Boston Red Sox (1939-1942 and 1946-1960). Williams was a two-time American League Most Valuable Player (MVP) winner, led the league in batting six times, and won the Triple Crown twice. A 19-time All-Star, he had a career batting average of .344 with 521 home runs, and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1966. Williams recorded a hit 34 percent of the time; he reached base an astounding 48 percent of the time. Williams was the last player in Major League Baseball to bat over .400 in a single season (.406 in 1941). Williams holds the highest career batting average of anyone with 500 or more home runs. His best year was 1941, when he hit .406 with 37 HR, 120 RBI, and 135 runs scored. His .553 on base percentage set a record that stood for 61 years.] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_Williams
  • Change Notes

    • 1980-05-01: new
    • 2013-01-13: revised
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