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From Library of Congress Name Authority File


Lumumba, Patrice, 1925-1961


  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Fuller Name

    • Patrice Émery
  • Variants

    • us: Okitasombo, Alois, 1925-1962
    • us: Okit'Asombo, Élias, 1925-1962
  • Additional Information

  • Exact Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Sources

    • found: His Propos de Patrice Lumumba, 1960.
    • found: Britannica academic edition website, viewed June 20, 2013 (Patrice Lumumba, full name Patrice Hemery Lumumba; b. July 2, 1025, Onalua, Belgian Congo (now RD Congo); d. Jan. 1961, Katanga province; a founder of the Mouvement National Congolais, MNC, in Oct. 1958; elected first prime minister of RD Congo, June-Sep. 1960)
    • found: Wikipedia, June 20, 2013 (Patrice Émery Lumumba, born Élias Okit'Asombo; July 2, 1925-Jan. 17, 1961; member of the Tetela ethnic group, also spoke French, Lingala, Swahili, and Tshiluba)
    • found: Huza.RG website, Aux grands hommes l'Afrique est reconnaissante, Apr. 1, 2013, viewed June 20, 2013 (Alois Okitasombo, known as Patrice Emery Lumumba)
    • found: The Oxford Encyclopedia of African Thought, accessed February 28, 2015, via Oxford African American Studies Center database: (Lumumba, Patrice; Patrice Emery Lumumba; prime minister, revolutionary; born 2 July 1925 in Katako-Kombe, Democratic Republic of Congo; studied at a Catholic school and a Protestant mission school; self-educated; pursued a political career (1958) based on affirmative, anti-colonial ideology of Positive Neutralism; became the first Prime Minister of Democratic Republic of Congo (30 June 1960-17 January 1961); was the founder and president of the Congolese National Movement, founded October (1958); demanded full independence of Congo from Belgium (1959); mobilized all Congolese across class, gender, race, pressuring Belgium to grant the independence to Democratic Republic of Congo (30 June 1960); at the Congress for Freedom of Culture at University of Ibadan, Nigeria (22 March 1959), called on emerging independent African states to further African culture; his ideas about nationalism, pan-Africanism, cultural translation, African subjectivity, globalization are still topical today; was assassinated by colonialist and imperialist forces on 17 January 1961 in Katanga, Democratic Republic of Congo)
  • Editorial Notes

    • [Machine-derived non-Latin script reference project.]
    • [Non-Latin script reference not evaluated.]
  • Change Notes

    • 1979-06-21: new
    • 2018-08-17: revised
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