The Library of Congress > Linked Data Service > LC Name Authority File (LCNAF)

Sadat, Anwar, 1918-1981


  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Variants

    • Anwar al-Sādāt, 1918-1981
    • Sadate, Anwar, 1918-1981
    • El Sadat, Anwar, 1918-1981
    • Anwar el-Sadate, 1918-1981
    • Anwar El Sadat, 1918-1981
    • Anwar Sadat, 1918-1981
    • Muḥammad Anwar al-Sādāt, 1918-1981
    • Sādāt, Muḥammad Anwar, 1918-1981
    • Sadat, Anṿar, 1918-1981
    • סאדאת, אנוור
    • סאדאת, אנור
    • السادات، انور
    • انور السادات
    • سادات، أنور
    • سادات، أنور، 1918-
    • سادات، أنور، 1918-1981
    • ساداتو أنور
    • سدات، انور
  • Additional Information

    • Birth Date

        (edtf) 1918
    • Death Date

        (edtf) 1981-10-06
    • Has Affiliation

    • Has Affiliation

        • Organization: Military Academy (Cairo, Egypt)
        • Organization: Free Officers Committee Organization
    • Birth Place

        Mit Abu al-Kawm (Egypt)
    • Death Place

    • Associated Locale

    • Gender

        male
    • Associated Language

    • Occupation

  • Related Terms

  • Closely Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Sources

    • found: Hirst, D. Sadat, 1981:t.p. (Sadat) prologue (d. 1981)
    • found: His Wathāʼiq al-Sādāt, 1979- :v. 1, t.p. (Muḥammad Anwar al-Sādāt)
    • found: His Anṿar Sadat ʻal milḥamah ṿe-shalom, 1970-1980, c1982:t.p. (Anṿar Sadat)
    • found: Statesman's year-book, 1988/89p. 445 (Col. Muhammad Anwar Sadat, president of Egypt 28. Sept. 1970-6 Oct. 1981 (assassinated))
    • found: Africana: The Encyclopedia of the African and African American Experience, Second Edition, accessed April 20, 2015, via Oxford African American Studies Center database:(Sadat, Anwar al-; president, Nobel Prize winner, politician; born 1918 in Mit Abu al-Kawm, Egypt; graduated from Cairo Military Academy (1938); joined the Free Officers Committee Organization (1950); participated in overthrow of Egyptian monarchy (1952); became vice president (1964-1966 and 1969-1970) and president (1970); expelled Soviet military advisers (1972); attacked Israel, launching the Yom Kippur War (1973); presented his peace plan to the Israeli Knesset (Parliament) (1977); held diplomatic meetings with Israel, culminating in the Camp David Accords (1979); was awarded the 1978 Nobel Peace Prize; was assassinated and succeeded by his vice president, Hosni Mubarak; died 1981 in Cairo, Egypt)
  • Editorial Notes

    • [Machine-derived non-Latin script reference project.]
    • [Non-Latin script references not evaluated.]
  • Change Notes

    • 1979-08-16: new
    • 2015-09-08: revised
  • Alternate Formats