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From Library of Congress Name Authority File


us: Truth, Sojourner, 1799-1883


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    • us: Baumfree, Isabella, 1799-1883
    • us: Sojourner Truth, 1799-1883
    • us: Van Wagenen, Isabella, 1799-1883
    • us: Van Wagener, Isabella, 1799-1883
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      Truth, Sojourner, d. 1883
  • Sources

    • found: Fanaticism ... 1835.
    • found: NUCMC data from Library of Congress, Manuscript Div. for Chapin, K.G. Papers, 1930-1972 (Sojourner Truth)
    • found: NUCMC file (Truth, Sojourner, ca. 1797-1883)
    • found: Sojourner Truth, 1999: CIP chronology (1797: Isabella Baumfree born in slavery in Ulster Co., N.Y.; Isabella changes her name to Sojourner Truth)
    • found: Encyclopedia Britannica online, 3 December 2010 (legal name Isabella Van Wagener, born circa 1797 in Ulster County, N.Y.; died 26 November 26 1883 in Battle Creek, Michigan; African American evangelist, reformer, abolitionist, women's rights activist)
    • found: African American National Biography, accessed September 17, 2014, via Oxford African American Studies Center database (Truth, Sojourner; Isabella; abolitionist, slave, women's rights advocate, litigant; born 1799 in Hurley, Ulster County, New York, United States; born slave; emancipated under New York State law in 1827; joined the Methodist church in Kingston; met Matthias (1832) and remained his follower (until 1835); on 1 June 1843, acting on the instructions of what she believed to be the Holy Spirit, Isabella changed her name to Sojourner Truth, which translates as itinerant preacher, and set out toward the east to preach the need to embrace Jesus; dictated The Narrative of Sojourner Truth to Olive Gilbert, published in Boston (1850); spoke at a women's rights convention in Worcester, Massachusetts (1850); continued her lecture tours (1850s); met President Abraham Lincoln in his office (1864), assisted Southern black refugees, conceived of a plan for resettling freedpeople on government lands in the West, collected signatures on a petition to Congress; best known as a Methodist-style itinerant preacher and religiously inspired supporter of women's rights and the abolition of slavery; she also advocated temperance and associated with spiritualists and water-cure enthusiasts; died 26 November 1883 in Battle Creek, Michigan, United States)
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    • 2016-03-26: revised
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