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From Library of Congress Name Authority File


York (England)


  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Variants

    • Eboracum (England)
    • Eoforwic (England)
    • Jorvik (England)
    • City of York (England)
    • Jorvic (England)
    • Eburacum (England)
    • Yerk (England)
    • Yourke (England)
    • Yarke (England)
    • York Unitary Authority (England)
  • Additional Information

  • Exact Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Closely Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Earlier Established Forms

    • York (North Yorkshire)
    • York, Eng
  • Sources

    • found: A hundred years ... 1951.
    • found: BL hdg.(York (England))
    • found: G.B. Ordnance Survey. Ordnance Survey historical map and guide, Viking and medieval York, c1988:map recto (York, Eboracum, Eoforwic, Jorvic)
    • found: Wikipedia, 13 Nov. 2012(York; from 1996, the term City of York describes a unitary authority area which includes rural areas beyond the old city boundaries)
    • found: GeoNames, algorithmically matched, 2009(ppl; 53°58ʹ00ʺN 001°05ʹ00ʺW)
    • found: GEOnet, 6 April 2016:York as populated place (York (approved); variant names: Eboracum, Jorvik; geopolitical entity name: United Kingdom; first-order administrative division name: York; 53° 58ʹ 00ʺ N, 001° 05ʹ 00ʺ W; 53.966667 [N], -1.083333 [W]; seat of a first-order administrative division)
    • found: GEOnet, 6 April 2016:York as unitary authority area (York (approved and short); City of York (approved); geopolitical entity name: United Kingdom; first-order administrative division name: York; 53° 57ʹ 15ʺ N, 001° 03ʹ 51ʺ W; 53.954115 [N], -1.064262 [W]; first-order administrative division)
    • found: Wikipedia, 6 April 2016:York (York; a historic walled city at the confluence of the rivers Ouse and Foss in North Yorkshire, England; the municipality is the traditional county town of Yorkshire to which it gives its name; founded by the Romans as Eboracum in 71 AD; variant spellings: Eburacum or Eburaci; became the Anglian Eoforwic in the 7th century; when the Danish army conquered the city in 866, its name became Jórvík; spelling variations of Middle English Yerk in the 14th century, Yourke in the 16th century, Yarke in the 17th century; in the Middle Ages, became the capital of the northern ecclesiastical province of the Church of England, a role it has retained; gained the status of a county borough in 1889, under the Local Government Act 1888, and existed so until 1974, when, under the Local Government Act 1972, it became a non-metropolitan district in the county of North Yorkshire; from 1996, the term City of York describes a unitary authority area which includes rural areas beyond the old city boundaries) Local Government Commission for England, 1992 (York unitary authority; on 1 April 1996, the City of York was expanded and separated from North Yorkshire)
  • Editorial Notes

    • [Authorized access point used for both York as a city and York as a unitary authority area (following the British Library guide to RDA name authority records, consulted 6 April 2016).]
  • Change Notes

    • 1980-05-22: new
    • 2016-04-16: revised
  • Alternate Formats