The Library of Congress > Linked Data Service > LC Name Authority File (LCNAF)

ʻUrābī, Aḥmad, 1840 or 1841-1911


  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Variants

    • Aḥmad ʻArābī, 1840 or 1841-1911
    • Aḥmad ʻIrābī, 1840 or 1841-1911
    • Aḥmad ʻUrābī, 1840 or 1841-1911
    • ʻArābī, Aḥmad, 1840 or 1841-1911
    • ʻArabi Pasha, 1840 or 1841-1911
    • ʻIrābī, Aḥmad, 1840 or 1841-1911
    • Ourabi, Ahmad, 1840 or 1841-1911
    • Ourabi, Ahmed, 1840 or 1841-1911
    • ʻUrābī, Aḥmad, 1840 or 41-1911
    • ʻUrābī Pasha, 1840 or 1841-1911
    • أحمد عرابي
    • عرابي، أحمد، 1911-41 or 1840
    • عرابي، احمد
    • عرابي، احمد، 1840 or 1841-1911
    • عرابى، أحمد، 1840 أو 41-1911
  • Additional Information

    • Birth Date

        (edtf) [1840,1841]
    • Death Date

        (edtf) 1911-09-21
    • Has Affiliation

    • Associated Locale

    • Gender

    • Associated Language

    • Field of Activity

        (lcsh) Egypt--History--Autonomy and independence movements
      • Occupation

          Egypt--Armed Forces--Officers
            Nationalists
              lcsh
          • Closely Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

          • Earlier Established Forms

            • ʻUrābī, Aḥmad, 1840 or 41-1911
          • Sources

            • found: Secret history of occupation of Egypt, 1907.
            • found: The Illustrated London news, June 10, 1882, cover page (Arabi Pasha, the wood-be dictator of Egypt)
            • found: Wikipedia, March 13, 2019(Ahmed ʻUrabi; ; Colonel Ahmed ʻUrabi or Ourabi; known in English and by himself as Ahmad Ourabi; born 31 March 1841 in the village of Hirriyat Razna near Zagazig, Sharqia Governate; Egyptian nationalist, revolutionary, and officer of the Egyptian army; the first political and military leader in Egypt to rise from the fellahin; enrolled in Al-Azhar University in 1849 to complete his schooling; entered the army and rose through the ranks quickly, becoming lieutenant colonel by age 20 (made possible by reforms of Khedive Ismail); a galvanizing speaker, and considered an authentic voice of Egypt due to his peasant origins; he and followers in 1879 formed the Egyptian Nationalist Party [al-Ḥizb al-Waṭanī); participated in an 1879 mutiny that developed into a general revolt against the Anglo-French dominated administration of Khedive Tewfik; he was promoted to Tewfik's cabinet and began reforms of Egypt's military and civil administrations; but the demonstrations of 1882 prompted a British bombardment and invasion that deposed ʻUrabi in favor of a British occupation; after surrender to the British he was tried for rebellion, with British defense and intervention; sentenced to death but immediately commuted to banishment for life, to Ceylon (now Sri Lanka); there he worked to improve the quality of education among Muslims; in May 1901, Khedive Abbas II, Tewfik's son and successor, permitted him to return to Egypt in 1901; he died there on 21 September 1911)
          • Editorial Notes

            • [Machine-derived non-Latin script reference project.]
            • [Non-Latin script references not evaluated.]
          • Change Notes

            • 1983-08-08: new
            • 2019-03-14: revised
          • Alternate Formats