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From Library of Congress Name Authority File


Goines, Donald, 1937-1974


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    • found: Donald writes no more, 1974:t.p. (Donald Goines) p. 4 of cover (1936-1974) p. 11 (also wrote under pseud. Al C. Clark) p. 28 (b. "some five years later" than sister b. 1933) p. 219-220 (d. 10/21/74)
    • found: Black Am. writers(Goines, Donald; b. 12/15/37, Detroit)
    • found: African American National Biography, accessed via The Oxford African American Studies Center online database, July 27, 2014:(Goines, Donald Joseph; Al C. Clark; military, fiction writer; born 15 December 1937 in Detroit, Michigan, United States; dropped out of school after finishing the ninth grade; served in the U.S. Air Force (1952-1954), became addicted to heroin during his overseas assignments in Japan and Korea; spent six and one-half years in jail throughout his lifetime for illegal activities; wrote and published sixteen novels, five of the these novels were under the pen name Al C. Clarkwrote; his novels have never been out of print and have been embraced by the hip-hop generation of the 1990s; he and his common-law wife, Shirley Sailor, were shot in their Detroit home; died 21 October 1974 in Detroit, Michigan, United States)
    • found: African American National Biography, accessed January 30, 2015, via Oxford African American Studies Center database:(Goines, Donald Joseph; Al C. Clark; military, fiction writer; born 15 December 1937 in Detroit, Michigan, United States; dropped out school after finishing the ninth grade and served three years in the U.S. Air Force, using fake ID to enlist because of young age (1952); became addicted to heroin during his overseas assignments in Japan and Korea; lived on the streets; was arrested for armed robbery and, all told, spent six and one-half years in jail throughout his lifetime for his illegal activities; his first novel, Dopefiend: The Story of a Black Junkie, was released from prison (1970); second novel, Whoreson, was published by Holloway House (1971); Crime Partners is the first in the Kenyatta series (1974); published eight more novels; his most significant novel, Black Gangster became an inspiration for rappers and hip-hop artists, including for Tupac Shakur, Noreaga, Jay-Z, DMX, Kool Genius Rap, and Busta Rhymes; died 21 October 1974 in Detroit, Michigan, United States)
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    • PS3557.O3255
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    • 1984-01-03: new
    • 2015-12-21: revised
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