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From Library of Congress Name Authority File


us: Bostic, Earl, 1913-1965


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  • Additional Information

    • Birth Date

        (edtf) 1913-04-25
    • Death Date

        (edtf) 1965-10-28
    • Birth Place

        (naf) Tulsa (Okla.)
    • Death Place

        (naf) Rochester (N.Y.)
    • Associated Locale

        (naf) United States
    • Has Affiliation

        • Organization: (naf) Xavier University (New Orleans, La.)
        • Organization: (naf) Lionel Hampton Allstar Big Band
        • Organization: (naf) King Record Company
    • Gender

        male
    • Occupation

        (lcsh) Rhythm and blues musicians
          (lcsh) Singers
            (lcsh) Saxophonists
              (lcsh) Jazz musicians
          • Sources

            • found: His Sax "o" boogie [SR] p1984: label (Earl Bostic, saxophone) container (b. 4/25/13 in Tulsa, Okla.; d. 10/28/65 in Rochester, N.Y.)
            • found: African American National Biography, accessed December 21, 2014, via Oxford African American Studies Center database: (Bostic, Earl; rhythm and blues musician/ singer, saxophonist, jazz musician; born 25 April 1913 in Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States; enrolled at Xavier University in New Orleans to study music theory, harmony, and various instruments; played and arranged for a band led by Charlie Creath and Fate Marable (1935-1936); led his own band at Small's Paradise in Harlem intermittently (1939-1940s); played trumpet, guitar, or baritone sax in addition to his alto sax; contributed his best-known composition and arrangement, "Let Me Off Uptown", to Gene Krupa's big band (1941); played and wrote for Lionel Hampton's big band (1943-1944); changed his stylistic orientation (1940s); signed with the King label (1949); recorded "Flamingo", which held the top position on the rhythm and blues popularity chart for twenty weeks (1951); died 28 October 1965 in Rochester, New York, United States)
          • Change Notes

            • 1987-09-04: new
            • 2015-12-16: revised
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