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From Library of Congress Name Authority File


us: Davis, Benjamin J. (Benjamin Jefferson), 1903-1964


  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Variants

    • us: Davis, Benjamin Jefferson, 1903-1964
  • Additional Information

    • Birth Date

        (edtf) 1903-09-08
    • Death Date

        (edtf) 1964-08-22
    • Birth Place

        (naf) Dawson (Ga.)
    • Death Place

        (naf) New York (N.Y.)
    • Associated Locale

        (naf) United States
    • Has Affiliation

        • Organization: (naf) Harvard University
        • Organization: (naf) Communist Party of America
        • Organization: (naf) New York (N.Y.). City Council
    • Organization

        (naf) Harvard University
    • Organization

        (naf) Communist Party of America
    • Organization

        (naf) New York (N.Y.). City Council
    • Has Affiliation

        • Organization: Liberator (Nespaper)
    • Organization

        Liberator (Nespaper)
    • Gender

        male
  • Exact Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Earlier Established Forms

      Davis, Benjamin Jefferson, 1903-1964Davis, Benjamin Jefferson,1903-1964
  • Sources

    • found: His Communist councilman from Harlem, 1990: CIP t.p. (Benjamin J. Davis) data sheet (b. 1903)
    • found: LC data base, 10-23-90 (hdg.: Davis, Benjamin Jefferson, 1903-1964)
    • found: Encyclopedia of African American History, 1896 to the Present: From the Age of Segregation to the Twenty-first Century, accessed December 21, 2014, via Oxford African American Studies Center database: (Davis, Benjamin J., Jr.; newspaper editor/ publisher, political figure; born 08 September 1903 in Dawson, Georgia, United States; earned a law degree from Harvard (1930); joined the Communist Party; edited the Liberator(1935); secretary of the Communist Party's Harlem division (1937); won a city council seat from Manhattan, was supported by Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday (1943); held subway fares down to five cents, advanced popular demand for rent control, secured a municipal Fair Employment Practices Commission, and curbed racial restrictions in housing; won more Harlem votes than in his previous elections (1949); signed a statement to the United Nations on American race discrimination (1951); released from federal prison (1954); elected the Communist Party's national secretary (1959); spoke on college campuses (1961-1962); died 22 August 1964 in New York, New York, United States)
  • Change Notes

    • 1990-10-23: new
    • 2015-12-18: revised
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