The Library of Congress > Linked Data Service > LC Name Authority File (LCNAF)

Palmer, Dee, 1937-


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  • Variants

    • Palmer, David, 1937-
    • Palmer, David (Musician)
  • Additional Information

  • Additional Related Forms

  • Closely Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

    • WikidataDee Palmer Offsite linkLabel from public data source Wikidata
  • Earlier Established Forms

    • Palmer, David (Musician)
  • Sources

    • found: War child [SR] p1974:container (David Palmer, conductor)
    • found: Wikipedia, August 29, 2014(Dee Palmer is an English composer, arranger, and keyboardist best known for having been a member of the rock group Jethro Tull. Palmer studied composition at the Royal Academy of Music with Richard Rodney Bennett, winning the Eric Coates Prize and The Boosey and Hawkes Prize. She was appointed a Fellow of The Royal Academy of Music in 1994; in 2003, Palmer came out as transsexual and intersex, changing her name to Dee)
    • found: Allmusic website, August 29, 2014(David Palmer; English rock musician; active 1960s-1990s; born July 2, 1937 in Hendon, London, England; genre: Pop/Rock, Easy Listening; styles: Orchestral/Easy Listening, Prog-Rock; attended the Royal Military School of Music; studied composition at the Royal Academy of Music, winning the Eric Coates Prize for composing in his senior year; made his debut as an arranger and conductor in popular recording in 1967 with his work on the orchestral accompaniment for the Bert Jansch album Nicola. In 1968, he was hired by producer Terry Ellis to write the horn and string parts for the song "Move on Alone" by Jethro Tull for what would become their first album, This Was. By the time of Aqualung in 1971, his arrangements were nearly as prominent as the keyboard playing of John Evan, and Palmer had effectively become the sixth member of Tull, in fact if not contractually. He was kept busy on the group's two progressive rock epics, Thick as a Brick (1972) and A Passion Play (1973), and the somewhat more modestly proportioned War Child (1974), and even played with them on-stage during their 1975 tour. He was a part of the group for the next five years, through Stormwatch; in 1980, Palmer left Jethro Tull; he was engaged in the '80s to arrange and conduct an orchestral tribute album to the band entitled A Classic Case, which became the first in a series of such albums devoted to the work of Yes, Genesis, et al. He also kept busy writing, arranging, and conducting music for movies and television in the years after leaving Tull. Palmer's later orchestral tribute albums have included rearrangements and recordings of the music of the Beatles and Queen, and an album of Norwegian pop music standards arranged for orchestra. Palmer receded from the rock press in the '70s through the heady days of Tull's chart dominance until 2003, when it was announced that he'd undergone a sex-change operation and would hereafter be known as Dee Palmer) - http://www.allmusic.com/artist/david-palmer-mn0000222917
    • found: Miss Dee Palmer website, August 29, 2014:home page (Miss Dee Palmer; musician, composer, arranger, author) about (Dee Palmer is an English composer/arranger, pianist and author; studied at the Royal Academy of Music in the 1960's; her career (which began as ghost writer for a leading film music composer) has included writing and performing music for Film, Television, Records, Theatre and the concert hall; from 1968 until 1980 she was arranger and, subsequently, keyboardist with the globally prestigious, seminal English rock group, Jethro Tull; appointed a Fellow of The Royal Academy of Music in 1994; she lives in East Sussex) - http://missdeepalmer.com/
  • Change Notes

    • 1992-12-17: new
    • 2014-09-01: revised
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