The Library of Congress > Linked Data Service > LC Name Authority File (LCNAF)

Nation of Islam (Chicago, Ill.)


  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Variants

    • NOI
    • ONOI
    • Original Nation of Islam
    • Umat ha-Islam (Chicago, Ill.)
    • אומת האיסלאם
  • Additional Information

  • Related Terms

  • Closely Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Sources

    • found: The secret relationship between Blacks and Jews, c1991- :v. 1, t.p. (Nation of Islam)
    • found: Encyclopedia of American religions, 1994(Nation of Islam is the name of four factions which broke away from American Muslim Mission in late 1970s and resumed the earliest name of that group. The headquarters of the four groups are: Chicago, Detroit, Atlanta, and the fourth currently unknown, but its chief mosque is in Baltimore. Chicago group headed by Louis Farrakhan)
    • found: Luʼis Faraḳan, Umat ha-Islam ṿeha-Yehudim, 1966.
    • found: A nation can rise no higher than its women, 2014:ECIP t.p. (African American women in the Nation of Islam, 1950-1975) ECIP data view (the Original Nation of Islam) ECIP ch. 1 (the original Nation of Islam; Nation of Islam; ONOI [used throughout]; NOI)
    • found: Religious myths and visions of America, 2009, viewed online Dec. 20, 2013:p. 125 (during his first 3 years as leader of the Nation of Islam, Wallace Muhammad gradually renounced the teachings of his late father and converted a number of former members of the Nation into traditional Muslims, then changed the Nation's name to the American Muslim Mission; in 1977 Farrakhan left the American Muslim Mission, taking several thousand followers with him, and reestablished the Nation of Islam under the name, the Original Nation of Islam; the Nation of Islam's influence reached its peak with the Million Man March in 1995 under NOI leader Louis Farrakhan; Farrakhan finally led a transition of the NOI back to traditional Islam when he reconciled with Warith Deen Mohammed in Feb. 1999, but today the Nation of Islam still maintains a distinct Black national identity, and has never disclaimed its Black nationalist myths)
    • found: Britannica academic edition website, viewed Dec. 20, 2013(Louis Farrakhan; leader from 1978 of the Nation of Islam; joined Nation of Islam in 1955; protégé of Malcolm X at Temple No. 7 in Harlem; appointed head minister of Boston Temple No. 11; the Nation of Islam fragmented after Elijah Muhammad's death in Feb. 1975; Farrakhan led a breakaway group in 1978 which he also called the Nation of Islam)
    • found: Nation of Islam website, viewed Dec. 20, 2013:home (Nation of Islam; NOI; location, Chicago)
    • found: Wikipedia, Dec. 20, 2013(Nation of Islam (NOI); founded in Detroit July 1930; in 1977 Louis Farrakhan rejected Warith Deen Mohammed's leadership and re-established the Nation of Islam on the original model; he took over their headquarter Temple, Mosque Maryam (Mosque #2), located in Chicago (national hdq.), and regained many of the Nation of Islam's original properties; most of the members are in the U.S., but also in other countries incl. Canada, the U.K., France, Jamaica, and Trinidad & Tobago; currently there are over 130 NOI temples throughout the world)
    • found: Southern Poverty Law Center website, viewed Dec. 19, 2013(Nation of Islam (NOI); location, Chicago; ideology, black separatist; founded in Detroit ghettos in 1930 by Wallace D. Fard (Farad Muhammad) and his "messenger" and successor, Elijah Muhammad; considered insignificant throughout the 1930s-1940s; had meteoric rise in membership in the 1950s-1960s, founded businesses and educational ventures; when leader Elijah Muhammad died in 1975, his son Wallace Deen Muhammad (later Imam Warithuddin Muhammad) attempted to dismantle the Nation's material empire and bring NOI into mainstream Islam; in 1977 Louis Farrakhan rebelled and declared the creation of a "resurrected" NOI based on the original ideology of Elijah Muhammad; at the head of the new NOI he rebuilt an empire)
  • Editorial Notes

    • [Machine-derived non-Latin script reference project.]
    • [Non-Latin script reference not evaluated.]
  • Change Notes

    • 1995-04-11: new
    • 2016-01-27: revised
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