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From Library of Congress Name Authority File


us: Patterson, Richard C., Jr. (Richard Cunningham), 1886-1966



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    • us: Patterson, Richard C., (Richard Cunningham), 1886-1966
  • Exact Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Earlier Established Forms

    • Patterson, Richard C., (Richard Cunningham), 1886-1966
  • Sources

    • found: NUCMC data from Harry S. Truman Library for His Papers, 1918-1966 (Patterson, Richard C., 1886- ; diplomat and businessman)
    • found: WwasWA, 1961-1968 (Patterson, Richard Cunningham, Jr.; d. 1966)
    • found: Richard C. Patterson, Jr., in Chronoscope, 1952 title frame (Richard C. Patterson, Jr., Minister to Switzerland)
    • found: ancestry.com, October 30, 2013 (Richard C. Patterson, Jr.; Richard Cunningham Patterson, Jr.; born January 29, 1886 in Omaha, Nebraska; graduated from Columbia University School of Mines with an engineering degree in 1907; as a mining engineer, he joined the Pershing expedition to Mexico as a Cavalry private; as a Major in the U.S. Army during WWI, he performed administrative work for the peace negotiators, assisted in organizing the American Legion in Paris, and rose to rank of Colonel; from 1927-1932 he was Commissioner of Correction, State Of New York; he guided the planning, design and construction of the Rikers Island Penitentiary complex, and he started the Prison Keepers School in 1927, the forerunner to the current Correction Academy; he was Executive Vice President of the National Broadcasting Company from 1932-1936; from 1938-1940 he was Assistant Secretary and later Undersecretary of the U.S. Department of Commerce (FDR Admin), handling sensitive anti-trust investigation matters and winding up virtually in charge of the agency during its secretary's absence; from 1940-1944 he was Chairman of Radio-Keith-Orpheum (RKO); in 1944, he served as U.S. Ambassador to the Yugoslav government, first working with exiled King Peter and then with Marshal Tito; from 1948-1050 he was U.S. Ambassador to Guatemala; from 1951-1953 he was U.S. Minister to Switzerland; from 1954-1966 he was chair of New York City Mayor Robert F. Wagner's Reception Committee, a post that eventually evolved into Chief of Protocol, Commissioner of Public Events and Commissioner of Commerce; he died September 30, 1966 in New York, New York)
  • Change Notes

    • 1997-10-14: new
    • 2013-11-06: revised
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