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Solovet͡skiĭ lagerʹ osobogo naznachenii͡a


  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Variants

    • Solovki (Concentration camp)
    • SLON
    • Solovets Special Purpose Prison of the Main Administration of State Security of the USSR
    • Solovetsky Special Purpose Camp
    • Solovet͡skiĭ kont͡slagerʹ
    • Solovet͡sʹkyĭ tabir osoblyvoho pryznachenni͡a
    • Solovki Prison Camp
    • Соловецкий лагерь особого назначения
    • Соловецький табір особливого призначення
  • Additional Information

    • Related Terms

      • Solovet͡skiĭ monastyrʹ
    • Closely Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

    • Sources

      • found: Brodskiĭ, I͡U. Solovki, c2002:t.p. (Solovki) p. 3 (Solovet͡skiĭ lagerʹ osobogo naznachenii͡a; SLON)
      • found: Solovet͡skiĭ lagerʹ osobogo naznachenii͡a website, 9 April 2003p. 3-4 (Solovet͡skiĭ lagerʹ osobogo naznachenii͡a; SLON; Solovet͡skiĭ kont͡slagerʹ; estab. 1923)
      • found: Middlebury College Bulgakov website, 9 April 2003(Solovki; SLON; Solovetsky Special Purpose Camp; located on the Solovetsky Islands, this was the first Soviet concentration camp; it held mostly political prisoners and was active from 1923 to 1939)
      • found: Encyc. of Ukraine:v. 4, p. 822 (Solovets Islands. A penal colony in the White Sea, Arkhangelsk oblast, Russia. In the 1420s and 1430s monks settled on the islands, and by the end of the 16th century they had become a major outpost of Russian monastic life in the far north. A strategic frontier fortress was built there. Until 1903 the islands were used by the tsars as a prison and place of banishment for political and religious offenders. Most of the monks evacuated the islands after the Russian Revolution, and in 1923 the Bolsheviks established the Solovets Special Purpose Camp there, modeled on prisoner-of-wars camps. Later it became part of the Northern Special Purpose Camp Complex [no publs. in LC data base], and still later, Section Eight of the White Sea-Baltic Camp Complex [no publs. in LC data base]. In 1937 the camp in the Solovets Islands was renamed the Solovets Special Purpose Prison of the Main Administration of State Security of the USSR. For most of the 1920s the regime in the camp was relatively mild, and the number of prisoners small. With the onset of the Stalinist terror the Solovets Island were packed with prisoners living in severe conditions, subjected to cold, hunger, punishment cells, and beatings. In 1931-3 many prisoners were sent to work on the White Sea Canal. Late in 1938 the prisoners were evacuated from the Solovets Islands to other camps, and the island became a naval base; Solowky Concentration Camp)
      • found: Solovki, 2004:CIP preface (Solovki Prison Camp)
      • found: Solovet͡sʹkyĭ martyroloh Podilli͡a, 2017:title page verso (Соловецького табору особливого призначення = SoloveЋtЌskoho taboru osoblyvoho pryznachennЋiЌa)
      • notfound: LC data base, 02-25-04 (hdg.: Solovet͡skiĭ monastyrʹ)
    • Editorial Notes

      • [Machine-derived non-Latin script reference project.]
      • [Non-Latin script reference not evaluated.]
    • Change Notes

      • 2003-04-10: new
      • 2017-08-02: revised
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