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From Library of Congress Name Authority File


us: Munro, Leslie Knox, 1901-1974



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    • found: Leslie Knox Munro, in Chronoscope, 1953: title frame (Leslie Knox Munro, Ambassador from New Zealand to the United States)
    • found: Teara: The Encyclopedia of New Zealand, via WWW, October 24, 2013 (Munro, Leslie Knox, 1901-1974; lawyer, university lecturer, broadcaster, newspaper editor, diplomat, politician; Leslie Knox Munro was born in Auckland on 26 February 1901; he began law studies at Auckland University College and graduated LLM in 1923; from 1924 to 1938 Munro lectured in constitutional law and Roman law at Auckland University College; he became dean of the law faculty in 1938; he also served on the university council from 1939 to 1951 and on the Senate of the University of New Zealand from 1947 to 1951; he was president of the Auckland District Law Society from 1936 to 1938; he was also a member of the New Zealand Law Society council from 1936 to 1939; for three years before the Second World War he gave fortnightly talks on international affairs for the National Broadcasting Service, and from 1939 he contributed weekly articles on world events to the Weekly News; he also wrote editorials for the New Zealand Herald; Munro became associate editor in 1941, then editor from 1942 to 1951; in 1952 he was appointed as New Zealand ambassador to the United States and permanent representative of New Zealand to the United Nations; while permanent representative he became president of the Trusteeship Council (1953-1954), New Zealand representative on the Security Council (19541-1955) and president of the 12th session of the General Assembly (1957-1958); he was knighted KCMG in 1955 and KCVO in 1957; his term as ambassador and permanent representative came to an end in 1958; from 1961 he was also secretary general of the International Commission of Jurists; he remained in the United States until 1963; over the years he had been in demand as a speaker throughout the country and had been awarded honorary degrees from several universities, including Harvard and Michigan; in 1960 he published United Nations: hope for a divided world; after returning to New Zealand Munro became a member of Parliament, winning the Waipa seat as a National candidate in 1963 and holding it in 1966; he became the member for Hamilton West in 1969 and retired from politics in 1972; Sir Leslie Munro died in Hamilton on 13 February 1974)
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    • 2013-10-25: new
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