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Tabula smaragdina


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  • Variants

    • us: Emerald tablet
    • us: Smaragdine table
    • us: Hermes, Trismegistus. Tabula smaragdina
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  • Sources

    • found: The emerald tablet of Hermes, 2008:back cover (The emerald tablet of Hermes first appeared in the alchemical libraries of Europe during the 12th century. Traveling home with the Crusaders, this seminal work is alleged to be written by Hermes Trismegistus-Thoth. The work deeply influenced western magick, and the tenets presented influence modern magick to this day)
    • found: Wikipedia, Feb. 21, 2014(The Emerald Tablet, also known as the Smaragdine Table, or Tabula Smaragdina, is a compact and cryptic piece of Hermetica reputed to contain the secret of the prima materia and its transmutation. It was highly regarded by European alchemists as the foundation of their art and its Hermetic tradition. Although Hermes Trismegistus is the author named in the text, the first known appearance of the Emerald Tablet is in a book written in Arabic between the sixth and eighth centuries. The text was first translated into Latin in the twelfth century. Numerous translations, interpretations and commentaries followed. The text of the Smaragdine Tablet gives its author as Hermes Trismegistus ("Hermes the Thrice-Greatest"), a legendary Hellenistic combination of the Greek god Hermes and the Egyptian god Thoth. Despite the claims of antiquity, it's believed to be an Arabic work written between the sixth and eighth centuries. The oldest documentable source of the text is the Kitāb sirr al-ḫalīqa (Book of the Secret of Creation and the Art of Nature). This volume is attributed to "Balinas" (or Pseudo-Apollonius of Tyana) who wrote sometime around the eighth century. In his book, Balinas frames the Emerald Tablet as ancient Hermetic wisdom. He tells his readers that he discovered the text in a vault below a statue of Hermes in Tyana, and that, inside the vault, an old man on a golden throne held the emerald tablet. Following Balinas, an early version of the Emerald Tablet appeared in Kitab Ustuqus al-Uss al-Thani (Second Book of the Elements of Foundation) attributed to Jabir ibn Hayyan. The Smaragdine Tablet was first translated into Latin in the twelfth century by Hugo von Santalla. The text is also in an enlarged thirteenth century edition of Secretum Secretorum (also known as Kitab Sirr al-Asrar) - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emerald_tablet
  • Change Notes

    • 2014-02-21: new
    • 2014-02-27: revised
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