The Library of Congress > Linked Data Service > LC Name Authority File (LCNAF)

Painter, William, 1540?-1594. Palace of pleasure


  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Components

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Work Begun

    • 1566
  • Work Finished

    • 1567
  • Variants

    • Painter, William, 1540?-1594. Palace of pleasure beautified, adorned and well furnished, with pleasaunt histories and excellent nouelles, selected out of diuers good and commendable authors
    • Painter, William, 1540?-1594. Pallace of pleasure
    • Painter, William, 1540?-1594. Pallace of pleasure beautified, adorned and wel furnished, with pleasaunt historyes and excellent nouelles, selected out of diuers good and commendable authours
  • Additional Related Forms

  • Closely Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Sources

    • found: Wikipedia, June 10, 2014(under William Painter (author): The first volume of his The Palace of Pleasure appeared in 1566, and was dedicated to the earl of Warwick. It included sixty tales, and was followed in the next year by a second volume containing thirty-four new ones. A second improved edition in 1575 contained seven new stories. Painter borrows from Herodotus, Boccaccio, Plutarch, Aulus Gellius, Aelian, Livy, Tacitus, Quintus Curtius; from Giovanni Battista Giraldi, Matteo Bandello, Ser Giovanni Fiorentino, Giovanni Francesco Straparola, Queen Marguerite de Navarre and others; among better-known plays derived from the book are the Shakespearean Romeo and Juliet, Timon of Athens, Edward III, All's Well That Ends Well (from Giletta of Narbonne), Beaumont and Fletcher's Triumph of Death, John Webster's The Duchess of Malfi and James Shirley's Love's Cruelty)
    • found: Wikipedia, June 10, 2014(All's Well That Ends Well is a play by William Shakespeare. It is traditionally believed to have been written between 1604 and 1605, and was originally published in the First Folio in 1623; Though originally the play was classified as one of Shakespeare's comedies, the play is now considered by some critics to be one of his problem plays, so named because they cannot be neatly classified as tragedy nor comedy; The play is based on a tale (3.9) of Boccaccio's The Decameron. Shakespeare may have read an English translation of the tale in William Painter's Palace of Pleasure)
    • found: Folger Shakespeare Library website, June 10, 2014:All's Well That Ends Well (All's Well That Ends Well; Most scholars believe that Shakespeare wrote All's Well That Ends Well between 1601 and 1605. Its first known publication was in the 1623 First Folio. Among Shakespeare's sources was William Painter's Palace of Pleasure, an English translation of the story as told in Boccaccio's Decameron)
    • found: Encyclopædia Britannica online, June 10, 2014(under William Painter: English author whose collection of tales The Palace of Pleasure, based on classical and Italian originals, served as a sourcebook for many Elizabethan dramatists; The first volume of The Palace of Pleasure, which appeared in 1566, contained 60 tales. It was followed in the next year by a volume including 34 new stories. An improved edition (1575) contained seven more new stories. To its popularity, and that of similar collections, is due the high proportion of Elizabethan plays with Italian settings. Appius and Virginia, a Tragedy and Robert Wilmot's The Tragedy of Tancred and Gismund were taken from Painter's book, and it was also the source for William Shakespeare's Timon of Athens and All's Well That Ends Well (and probably for details in Romeo and Juliet and The Rape of Lucrece), for Philip Massinger's The Maid of Honour and The Picture, and for James Shirley's Loves Crueltie)
    • found: Oxford dictionary of national biography, via WWW, June 10, 2014(under Painter, William (1540?-1595): The Palace of Pleasure; In 1566 William Jones published the first volume of Painter's Palace of Pleasure, whose title-page promises readers a book 'beautified, adorned and well-furnished with Pleasant Histories and excellent Novels'. It was followed the next year by the second volume. The complete work was republished in two volumes in 1575 with a dedication to Ambrose Dudley, earl of Warwick, master of the ordnance. It is a collection of anecdotes and stories translated from ancient and humanist writers for recreational reading and some moral instruction. Painter's sources range from the Greek historian Herodotus through Romans, mainly Livy and Aulus Gellius, to Italians like Matteo Bandello and Frenchmen like François de Belleforest. The book was widely read, imitated, and plagiarized; Painter seems to have left traces in every notable Tudor playwright, who dramatized popular literature with the zeal of the modern film producer. John Webster, for instance, takes all but minor details of the plot of The Duchess of Malfi from Painter's version of Belleforest (Palace of Pleasure, 2.23))
    • found: The palace of pleasure beautified, adorned and well furnished, with pleasaunt histories and excellent nouelles, selected out of diuers good and commendable authors, 1566.
    • found: The pallace of pleasure beautified, adorned and wel furnished, with pleasaunt historyes and excellent nouelles, selected out of diuers good and commendable authours, 1569.
    • found: The first tome of The palace of pleasure, 1574.
  • Change Notes

    • 2014-06-10: new
    • 2015-01-07: revised
  • Alternate Formats