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Grendel (Monster)


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  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Variants

    • Grendel (Giant)
    • Grendel (Legendary character)
    • Grendel (Fictitious character)
    • Γκρτ̔̈«”αγ·ντελ (Monster)
    • Gkrentel (Monster)
    • Grendill (Monster)
    • グレンデル (Monster)
    • Gurenderu (Monster)
    • Грендель (Monster)
    • Ґрендель (Monster)
  • Additional Information

  • Use For

  • Exact Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Closely Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Sources

    • found: Beowulf & Grendel, c2006.
    • found: Gardner, John. Grendel, 1971.
    • found: Encyclopædia Britannica online, July 29, 2014(under Grendel: Grendel, fictional character, a monstrous creature defeated by Beowulf in the Old English poem Beowulf (composed between 700 and 750 ce). Descended from the biblical Cain, Grendel is an outcast, doomed to wander the face of the earth. The 20th-century American writer John Gardner told the story of Beowulf from Grendel's point of view in Grendel (1971); under Beowulf: an evil monster, Grendel, who carries off Hrothgar's warriors and devours them; John Gardner's Grendel (1971) is a retelling of the story from the point of view of the monster)
    • found: The Oxford companion to English literature, 2009, via Oxford reference online, July 29, 2014(under Beowulf: Grendel, a monster who has attacked Heorot, the hall of the Danish king, Hrothgar)
    • found: The Oxford dictionary of phrase and fable, 2006, via Oxford reference online, July 29, 2014(Grendel: in the Old English epic poem Beowulf, the water monster who nightly attacks Heorot, the hall built by Hrothgar, king of Denmark, and each night kills and eats one of Hrothgar's thanes. Grendel is of the race of Cain, living away from humankind but drawn by savagery and greed to the hall where the king's men feast.)
    • found: The Oxford companion to world mythology, 2006, via Oxford reference online, July 29, 2014(Grendel was the terrifying giant-monster who was confronted and defeated by the hero Beowulf in the Anglo-Saxon epic of than name. He lived with his equally terrifying mother in an underwater lair.)
    • found: A dictionary of world mythology, 2003, via Oxford reference online, July 29, 2014(Grendel (Europe): The monster of the seventh-century Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf.)
    • found: Brewer's dictionary of phrase & fable, 2013, via Oxford reference online, July 29, 2014(Grendel: The mythical half-human water monster killed by Beowulf)
    • found: The Canadian Oxford dictionary, 2005, via Oxford reference online, July 29, 2014(Grendel: (in Old English legend) the monster slain by Beowulf.)
    • found: New Oxford American dictionary, 2013, via Oxford reference online, July 29, 2014(Grendel: the water monster killed by Beowulf in the Old English epic poem Beowulf.)
    • found: The Oxford dictionary of reference and allusion, 2014, via Oxford reference online, July 29, 2014(Grendel: The ferocious monster who terrorizes the court of the Danish king Hrothgar in the Old English poem Beowulf.)
    • found: Merriam-Webster online, July 29, 2014(Grendel: a monstrous man-eating descendant of Cain slain by Beowulf in the Old English poem Beowulf)
    • found: Collins English dictionary online, July 29, 2014(Grendel: (in Old English legend) a man-eating monster defeated by the hero Beowulf)
    • found: Wikipedia, July 29, 2014(Grendel; Grendel is one of three antagonists (along with Grendel's mother and the dragon) in the Anglo-Saxon epic poem Beowulf (AD 700-1000). Grendel is usually depicted as a monster or a Giant, although this is the subject of scholarly debate.) Greek page (Γκρτ̔̈«”αγ·ντελ = Gkrentel) Icelandic page (Grendill) Japanese page (グレンデル = Gurenderu) Russian page (Грендель = Grendel) Ukrainian page (Ґрендель = Grendel)
  • Editorial Notes

    • [Non-Latin script references not evaluated.]
  • Change Notes

    • 2014-07-29: new
    • 2017-04-28: revised
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