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us: Mercury (Roman deity)


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  • Variants

    • us: Mercure (Roman deity)
    • us: Mercurius (Roman deity)
    • us: Alipes (Roman deity)
    • us: Mercurio (Roman deity)
    • us: Merkuri (Roman deity)
    • us: Меркурый (Roman deity)
    • us: Merkuryĭ (Roman deity)
    • us: Меркурий (Roman deity)
    • us: Merkuriĭ (Roman deity)
    • us: Merkur (Roman deity)
    • us: Merc'her (Roman deity)
    • us: Mercuri (Roman deity)
    • us: Mercuriu (Roman deity)
    • us: Merkuro (Roman deity)
    • us: Merkurio (Roman deity)
    • us: Merkurius (Roman deity)
    • us: מרקוריוס (Roman deity)
    • us: Merḳuryus (Roman deity)
    • us: Merher (Roman deity)
    • us: Merkurs (Roman deity)
    • us: Merkurijus (Roman deity)
    • us: Меркур (Roman deity)
    • us: Merkurju (Roman deity)
    • us: メルクリウス (Roman deity)
    • us: Merukuriusu (Roman deity)
    • us: Merkury (Roman deity)
    • us: Mercur (Roman deity)
    • us: Merkuryo (Roman deity)
    • us: Меркурій (Roman deity)
    • us: 墨丘利 (Roman deity)
    • us: Moqiuli (Roman deity)
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  • Sources

    • found: Combet Farnoux, Bernard. Mercure romain, 1980.
    • found: Britannica online, September 30, 2015 (Mercury, Latin Mercurius, in Roman religion, god of merchandise and merchants, commonly identified with the Greek Hermes, fleet-footed messenger of the gods) {http://www.britannica.com/topic/Mercury-Roman-god}
    • found: Encyclopedia mythica, via WWW, September 30, 2015 (Mercury is god of trade and profit, merchants and travelers, but originally of the trade in corn. In later times he was equated with the Greek Hermes; during the time of the Roman Empire the cult of Mercury was widely spread, especially among the Celtic and Germanic peoples. The Celts have their Gaulish Mercury, and the Germans identified him with their Wodan; also known as Alipes)
    • found: The Oxford dictionary of phrase and fable, 2006, via encyclopedia.com website, September 30, 2015 (Mercury in Roman mythology, the Roman god of eloquence, skill, trading, and thieving, herald and messenger of the gods, presider over roads, and conductor of departed souls to Hades, who was identified with Hermes. He is usually represented in art as a young man with winged sandals and a winged hat, and bearing the caduceus)
    • found: The concise Oxford dictionary of English etymology, 1996, via encyclopedia.com website, September 30, 2015 (mercury (M-) Roman divinity identified with the Gr. Hermes, god of eloquence, messenger of the gods, patron of traders and roads, guide of departed souls; L. Mercurius, orig. god of commerce)
    • found: Wikipedia, September 30, 2015: Mercury (mythology) (Mercury (Latin: Mercurius) is a major Roman god, being one of the Dii Consentes within the ancient Roman pantheon. He is the patron god of financial gain, commerce, eloquence (and thus poetry), messages/communication (including divination), travelers, boundaries, luck, trickery and thieves; he is also the guide of souls to the underworld. He was considered the son of Maia and Jupiter in Roman mythology; In his earliest forms, he appears to have been related to the Etruscan deity Turms, both of which share characteristics with the Greek god Hermes; Like Hermes, he was also a god of messages, eloquence and of trade, particularly of the grain trade. Mercury was also considered a god of abundance and commercial success, particularly in Gaul, where he was said to have been particularly revered. He was also, like Hermes, the Romans' psychopomp, leading newly deceased souls to the afterlife) Aragonese page (Mercurio) Azerbaijani page (Merkuri [in roman]) Belarusian page (Меркурый = MerkuryІi) Bulgarian page (Меркурий = MerkuriІi) Bosnian page (Merkur)
    • found: Wikipedia, September 30, 2015: Breton page (Merc'her) Catalan page (Mercuri) Corsican page (Mercuriu) Welsh page (Mercher) Spanish page (Mercurio) Esperanto page (Merkuro) Basque page (Merkurio) French page (Mercure) Indonesian page (Merkurius) Icelandic page (Merkúríus) Italian page (Mercurio) Hebrew page (מרקוריוס = Merḳuryus) Cornish page (Merher) Latin page (Mercurius) Latvian page (Merkurs) Lithuanian page (Merkurijus) Ligurian page (Mercuio) Macedonian page (Меркур = Merkur) Maltese page (Merkurju) Japanese page (メルクリウス = Merukuriusu) Occitan page (Mercuri) Polish page (Merkury) Romanian page (Mercur) Tagalog page (Merkuryo) Ukrainian page (Меркурій = MerkuriІi) Chinese page (墨丘利 = Moqiuli)
  • Editorial Notes

    • [Non-Latin script references not evaluated.]
  • Change Notes

    • 2015-09-30: new
    • 2017-03-22: revised
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