The Library of Congress > Linked Data Service > LC Name Authority File (LCNAF)

Cole, Dandridge M., 1921-1965


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  • Fuller Name

    • Dandridge MacFarlan
  • Variants

    • Cole, D. M. (Dandridge MacFarlan), 1921-1965
  • Additional Information

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  • Sources

    • found: Islands in space, 1964:title page (Dandridge M. Cole)
    • found: Exploring the secrets of space, 1963:title page (Dandridge M. Cole)
    • found: Social and political implications of the ultimate human society, 1961:title page (D.M. Cole)
    • found: Wikipedia, November 1, 2016(Dandridge MacFarlan Cole; Dandridge MacFarlan Cole (February 19, 1921-October 29, 1965) was an American aerospace engineer, futurist, lecturer, and author; he was born in Sandusky, Ohio and raised in Bryn Athyn, Pennsylvania; he attended Princeton University, where he did student work for Albert Einstein; as a special wartime provision, he was allowed, after 3 years at Princeton, to satisfy the requirements for the bachelor's degree in chemistry by beginning medical school at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons; in March 1943, he enlisted as a private in the army, joining the 139th Airborne Engineer Battalion of the 17th Airborne Division; after the war, he returned to Princeton in 1946 under a program that allowed students who had left for the military to return and take additional courses; Cole took advantage of this to enroll in physics courses that would prepare him for graduate work at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he received a master's degree in Physics in 1949; from 1949 to 1953, he taught physics and astronomy at Phillips Exeter Academy, in Exeter, New Hampshire; in 1953, he took a job in the aerospace industry with the Martin Company in Baltimore, at that point settling for aircraft design; in 1956, he moved to the Martin facility in Denver and began to work for the space program, helping to design the Titan II, which launched the Gemini space capsules; in 1960 he became a consulting engineer in advance planning at the General Electric Missile and Space Division at Valley Forge, PA; he died in King of Prussia, Pennsylvania at age 44)
  • Change Notes

    • 2016-11-01: new
    • 2016-11-02: revised
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