The Library of Congress > Linked Data Service > LC Name Authority File (LCNAF)

Florida (New Spain)


  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Variants

    • La Florida (New Spain)
    • Spanish Florida (New Spain)
    • Tegesta (New Spain)
    • Florida, La (New Spain)
  • Additional Information

  • Related Terms

  • Sources

    • found: Cartas de officio de los gobernadores de la Florida oriental Don Manuel Joseph de Justis y Don Manuel de Montiano al Capitán General de la Isla de Cuba Don Juan Francisco de Güemes y Horcasitas desde el 22 de Marzo de 1737 hasta el 1e de Febrero de 1741, 1737-1741:final unnumbered page (la Florida)
    • found: Wikipedia, viewed February 23, 2017:Spanish Florida (Spanish Florida refers to the Spanish territory of La Florida, which was the first major European land claim and attempted settlement in North America during the European Age of Discovery. La Florida formed part of the Captaincy General of Cuba, the Viceroyalty of New Spain, and the Spanish Empire during Spanish colonization of the Americas. While it had no clearly defined boundaries, the territory was much larger than the present-day state of Florida, extending over much of what is now the southeastern United States, including all of present-day Florida plus portions of Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, South Carolina, and southeastern Louisiana. Spain's claim to this vast area was based on several wide-ranging expeditions mounted during the 16th century. However, Spain never exercised real control over La Florida much beyond several settlements and forts which were predominantly located in present-day Florida. Spanish Florida was established during the first official European expedition to North America in April 1513, when Juan Ponce de León spotted the east coast of the Florida peninsula and went ashore the next day. Assuming that he had found a large island, he claimed the land for Spain and named it La Florida, because it was the season of Pascua Florida ("Flowery Easter") and because much of the vegetation was in bloom. This claim was enlarged as several explorers (most notably Pánfilo Narváez and Hernando de Soto) landed near Tampa Bay in the mid-1500s and wandered as far north as the Appalachian Mountains and as far west as Texas in largely unsuccessful searches for gold and other riches. The presidio of St. Augustine was founded on Florida's Atlantic coast in 1565; a series of missions were established across the Florida panhandle, Georgia, and South Carolina during the 1600s; and Pensacola was founded on the western Florida panhandle in 1698, strengthening Spanish claims to that section of the territory. Great Britain temporarily gained control of Florida beginning in 1763 as a result of the Anglo-Spanish War, but while Britain occupied the territory, it did not develop it further. Sparsely populated British Florida stayed loyal to Crown during the American Revolutionary War, and by the terms of the Treaty of Paris which ended the war, the territory was returned to Spain in 1783. By 1812, the borders of Spanish Florida had been reduced to that of modern Florida. By the terms of the Adams-Onis Treaty of 1819, Spanish Florida ceased to exist in 1821, when control of the territory was officially transferred to the United States.)
    • found: Wikipedia, viewed February 23, 2017:History of Florida (From 1513 onward, the land became known as La Florida ("full of flowers"). After 1630, and throughout the 18th century, Tegesta (after the Tequesta tribe) was an alternate name of choice for the Florida peninsula following publication of a map by the Dutch cartographer Hessel Gerritsz in Joannes de Laet's "History of the New World". In 1763, Spain traded Florida to the Kingdom of Great Britain for control of Havana, Cuba, which had been captured by the British during the Seven Years' War. The British divided the territory into East Florida and West Florida. In 1783, the Treaty of Paris ended the Revolutionary War and returned all of Florida to Spanish control, but without specifying the boundaries. In the Treaty of San Lorenzo of 1795, Spain recognized the 31st parallel as the northern boundary.)
  • Change Notes

    • 2017-03-09: new
    • 2017-03-10: revised
  • Alternate Formats