The Library of Congress > Linked Data Service > LC Name Authority File (LCNAF)

Marsyas (Satyr)


  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Variants

    • Marsyas (Greek deity)
    • Μαρσυας (Satyr)
    • Martsias (Satyr)
    • Màrsies (Satyr)
    • Marsias (Satyr)
    • 마르시아스 (Satyr)
    • Marŭsiasŭ (Satyr)
    • Marsijas (Satyr)
    • Marszüasz (Satyr)
    • Marsjasz (Satyr)
    • Marsyas Silen (Satyr)
    • Марсий (Satyr)
    • Marsiĭ (Satyr)
    • Марсій (Satyr)
    • מארסיאס (Satyr)
  • Additional Information

  • Use For

  • Exact Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Closely Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

    • WikidataMarsyas Offsite linkLabel from public data source Wikidata
  • Sources

    • found: Small, Jocelyn Penny. Cacus and Marsyas in Etrusco-Roman legend, 1982.
    • found: Encyclopædia Britannica online, August 5, 2019(Marsyas, Greek mythology; Marsyas, legendary Greek figure of Anatolian origin. According to the usual Greek version, Marsyas found the aulos (double pipe) that the goddess Athena had invented and thrown away and, after becoming skilled in playing it, challenged Apollo to a contest with his lyre. The victory was awarded to Apollo, who tied Marsyas to a tree and flayed him) - https://www.britannica.com/topic/Marsyas-Greek-mythology
    • found: Ancient history encyclopedia, via WWW, August 5, 2019(Marsyas the satyr, or silen, was seen as a mythological founder of aulos playing or a divine judge of it by the ancient Greeks; The satyr Marsyas picked up Athena's auloi and at some point challenged Apollo to a contest (agon in the Greek). Apollo chose to play the lyre and, either through skill alone or a certain degree of trickery, beat Marsyas. Marsyas' punishment for thinking that he could out skill an Olympian was that he was hung up and skinned alive) - https://www.ancient.eu/Marsyas/
    • found: Theoi Project website, August 5, 2019(Marsyas was a Phrygian Satyr who invented the music of the flute. He found the very first flute which had been crafted but cast away by the goddess Athena who had been displeased by the bloating of the cheeks. Marsyas later challenged the god Apollon to a musical contest but lost when the god demanded they play their instruments upside-down in the second round--a feat ill-suited to the flute. As punishment for his hubris, Apollon had Marsyas tied to a tree and flayed alive. The rustic gods then transformed him into a stream; Greek name: Μαρσυας = Marsyas; He is variously called the son of Hyagnis, or of Oeagrus, or of Olympus. Some make him a satyr, others a peasant. All agree in placing him in Phrygia) - https://www.theoi.com/Georgikos/SatyrosMarsyas.html
    • found: GreekMythology.com, August 5, 2019(Marsyas was a satyr in Greek mythology, and he played an important role in two myths. In one myth, he played the aulos masterfully, a double-piped reed instrument. One day, he found an aulos down on the ground, which had been thrown aside by the goddess Athena; she had made the aulos, but had cursed it and thrown it after the other gods mocked her of how her cheeks moved when she played. In the other myth, Marsyas challenged the god of music Apollo to a contest of music. The contest was judged by the Muses, and Marsyas naturally lost. For committing hubris against Apollo, Marsyas was hanged inside a cave and was flayed alive. A source has it that Apollo later repented for the excessive punishment, and stopped playing the lyre for some time. Gods and nymphs mourned for Marsyas' death, and their tears were joined to create the river Marsyas which flew through the region of Phrygia. According to a different source, Marsyas didn't actually commit hubris, but it was Apollo who challenged the satyr to the contest because he was jealous of how masterfully Marsyas played the aulos) - https://www.greekmythology.com/Myths/Creatures/Marsyas/marsyas.html
    • found: Wikipedia, August 5, 2019(In Greek mythology, the satyr Marsyas (Μαρσύας) is a central figure in two stories involving music: in one, he picked up the double oboe (aulos) that had been abandoned by Athena and played it; in the other, he challenged Apollo to a contest of music and lost his hide and life) Basque page (Martsias) Catalan page (Màrsies) Spanish version (Marsias) Korean version (마르시아스 = Marŭsiasŭ) Indonesian version (Marsias) Italian version (Marsia) Lithuanian version (Marsijas) Hungarian version (Marszüasz) Polish version (Marsjasz) Portuguese version (Marsias) Romanian version (Marsyas Silen) Russian version (Марсий = Marsiĭ) Ukrainian page (Марсій = Marsiĭ) Hebrew version (מארסיאס = Marsyas)
  • Editorial Notes

    • [Non-Latin script references not evaluated.]
  • Change Notes

    • 2019-08-05: new
    • 2019-11-20: revised
  • Alternate Formats