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From Library of Congress Medium of Performance Thesaurus for Music


bandolín


  • A 15-stringed instrument from Ecuador that derives from the bandurria and/or bandola.

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  • Sources

    • found: Work cat: Guncay Albarracín, W., Escuela del bandolín ecuatoriano, 2012:page 67 (bandolín; possibly derived from the bandurria/bandola; widespread use in Spain and Europe in the 16th-18th centuries; greatest popularity in Ecuador from end of 19th-mid-20th century; flat back; body pear-shaped, rounded, oval, or shaped like a guitar; 5 courses of triple metallic strings)
    • found: Garland encyclopedia of world music:v. 2, p. 417 ((Ecuador): The bandolín is a type of flat-backed mandolin with five courses of triple strings struck with a plectrum. It is played by Quichua and Iberian-Ecuadorians in the highlands; certain Imbabura villages, such as Ilumán, used to be famous for their proliferation of bandolines)
    • found: Atlas of plucked instruments, viewed February 25, 2014(bandolin; from Ecuador; has body shaped like a bandola or mandolin, but 5 courses of triple metal strings in guitar tuning; made like a guitar with a flat back, raised fingerboard with metal frets, long, flat tuning head with 7 tuning machines on right and 8 on left; 15 metal strings run over loose bridge to metal tailpiece on end of body, which is different from the bandurria of Peru, which has strings fixed to the body)
    • found: Wikipedia, viewed February 25, 2014(bandolin; 15-stringed instrument used as a rhythm instrument in the Andean region of Ecuador during festivals with dancing and music; body shape similar to the bandola, cuatro, or guitar; bandolines)
  • General Notes

    • A 15-stringed instrument from Ecuador that derives from the bandurria and/or bandola.
  • Change Notes

    • 2014-09-02: new
    • 2014-12-11: revised
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