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Noxious weeds


  • Here are entered works on invasive, generally nonindigenous plants that are undesirable, troublesome, and difficult to control or eradicate and on plants that have been legally designated as injurious to public health, agriculture, recreation, wildlife, or property.

  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Variants

    • Harmful plants
    • Invasive weeds
    • Noxious plants
  • Broader Terms

  • Exact Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Closely Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Sources

    • found: Work cat.: Potash, L.L. Sensitive plants and noxious weeds of the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest, 1991.
    • found: GardenWeb gloss. of botanical terms, Web site, Sept. 27, 2000(noxious weeds; plants which may cause harm to collectors ... or invasive exotics or parasites ...)
    • found: King County (Wash.). Dept. of Natural Resources. Noxious weed control program, Web site, Sept. 27, 2000(Noxious weeds are non-native plants ... they grow aggressively, lack natural enemies and resist control methods. Noxious weeds and other invasive species ...)
    • found: USDA Plants Database, Web site, Oct. 19, 2000(has a section that provides access to Federal and state noxious weed lists, an invasive plant list, or an introduced plant list, each with links to more information)
    • found: Pest management strategy for Taranaki. Plants, 2001:p. 9 (harmful plants) p. 10 (pest plants capable of causing serious and unintended harmful effects; adverse impacts refers to the severity of the plant's external, uncompensated actual or potential effects on agricultural production, biodiversity and amenity values and Maori culture and traditions)
    • found: Dunster, J. Dict. of natural resource management, c1996(noxious plant: A plant that may or may not be specified by law as being undesirable, troublesome, and difficult to control or eradicate. Typically, noxious plants are shrubs and perennial or annual plants rather than tree species, and have the capacity to readily colonize areas such that they can completely stifle the growth of other plants.)
    • found: The dict. of forestry, c1998(noxious plant (weed): a plant specified by law as being especially undesirable, troublesome, and difficult to control)
    • found: Bureau of Land Management's weeds website, viewed Dec. 29, 2003(What is a noxious weed?: The term "weed" means different things to different people. In the broadest sense, it is any plant growing where it is not wanted. Weeds can be native or non-native, invasive or non invasive, and noxious or not noxious. Legally, a noxious weed is any plant designated by a Federal, State or county government as injurious to public health, agriculture, recreation, wildlife or property. A noxious weed is also commonly defined as a plant that grows of place (i.e. a rose can be a weed in a wheat field) and is "competitive, persistent, and pernicious." Are invasive plants the same as noxious weeds?: No. Invasive plants include not only noxious weeds, but also other plants that are not native to this country. The BLM considers plants invasive if they have been introduced into an environment where they did not evolve.)
    • found: Callihan, R.H. Idaho's noxious weeds, 1999, via WWW, Dec. 29, 2003:introd. (What is a noxious weed? Noxious weeds are plant species that have been designated "noxious" by law. The word "noxious" simply means deleterious, and all listed weeds are deleterious by definition. There are hundreds of weed species in Idaho; however, only 35 are designated noxious by Idaho law as of 1977. Currently, the Idaho Department of Agriculture uses the following criteria for designation of a noxious weed: 1) It must be present in but not native to Idaho. 2) It must be potentially more harmful than beneficial to Idaho. 3) Eradication must be economically physically feasible. 4) The potential adverse impact of the weed must exceed the cost of control)
    • found: Froude, V. Biological control options for invasive weeds of New Zealand protected areas, c2002.
    • found: Syrett, P. Biological control of weeds on conservation land, c2002:p. 6 (invasive weeds)
  • General Notes

    • Here are entered works on invasive, generally nonindigenous plants that are undesirable, troublesome, and difficult to control or eradicate and on plants that have been legally designated as injurious to public health, agriculture, recreation, wildlife, or property.
  • Change Notes

    • 2003-12-29: new
    • 2004-02-17: revised
  • Alternate Formats

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