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us: Parody films


  • This heading is used as a topical heading for works about films that comically imitate another work or group of works of a more serious nature. When used as a topical heading it is subdivided by the appropriate geographic, topical, and/or form subdivisions.
  • General works about the use of parody in motion pictures are entered under [Parody in motion pictures.]

  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Variants

    • us: Film genre parodies
    • us: Film parodies
    • us: Genre parodies (Motion pictures)
    • us: Genre parody films
    • us: Motion picture parodies
    • us: Movie parodies
    • us: Send-up films
    • us: Spoof films
    • us: Spoofs (Motion pictures)
    • us: Takeoff films
  • Broader Terms

  • Narrower Terms

  • Sources

    • found: Work cat.: Airplane! [VR], c1988.
    • found: Konigsberg, I. The complete film dict., 1997 (parody: A work that comically imitates another work or group of works of a more serious nature. The parody performs its humorous imitation by picking out the more pronounced and sometimes silly elements of its subject and exaggerating them, though it may do so in a good-natured as well as satiric manner; takeoff)
    • found: Singleton, R.S. Filmmaker's dict., c2000 (parody: Satirical or humorous imitation of a serious subject. Related terms: satire, spoof, takeoff; spoof: Humorous parody. For example, Airplane! (1980) was a spoof of airplane disaster films; takeoff: Another name for a parody. Also called a send-up)
    • found: History of the American cinema, c1990: v. 9, p. 290 (genre parody: "In the 1980s ... genre parody would become a genre unto itself ... archival pastiches like Dead Man Don't Wear Plaid, mock documentaries like This is Spinal Tap, and parody series like those originating with Airplane! and The Naked Gun)
    • found: Siegel, S. American film comedy, c1994: pp. 219-220, entry under: parody films (parodies of famous films and film genres; the Western parody Blazing Saddles and the horror spoof Young Frankenstein; movie parodies)
    • found: Langman, L. Encyc. of Am. film comedy, 1987: p. 469, entry under: Parody (In films, a humorous imitation of another work, such as a particular novel, play, poem, or another film; spoof; silent parodies; film parodies)
    • found: Geduld, H.M. An ill. glossary of film terms, c1973: under genre: Parody film, see Parody (Parody: an imitation, and distortion, of a more serious film for humorous effect; Spoof: a parody or mockery of another film or film genre)
    • found: Web. 3 (spoof n. 2: a light, amiable, humorous but usu. telling takeoff (as on human nature, customs, or manners) : parody)
    • found: Am. herit. dict. of the Eng. lang., c2000 (spoof 3. A gentle satirical imitation; a light parody)
    • found: Random House Web. unabr. dict., c1997 (spoof 1. a mocking imitation of someone or something, usually light and good-humored; lampoon or parody)
    • found: Busch, C. Die! Mommy! Die! : a comic thriller, c2005: t.p. verso (Die! Mommy! Die! is a comic melodrama that evokes the 1960's movie thrillers that featured such aging cinematic icons as Bette Davis, Joan Crawford, Lana Turner, and Susan Hayward.)
    • found: Phillips, M. Reviews : Die! Mommy! Die!, via WWW, May 20, 2005 ("the new Charles Busch spoof"; "Die! Mommy! Die! carries the subtitle 'The Fall of the House of Sussman,' which tells you something about Busch's parodic range")
  • General Notes

    • This heading is used as a topical heading for works about films that comically imitate another work or group of works of a more serious nature. When used as a topical heading it is subdivided by the appropriate geographic, topical, and/or form subdivisions.
    • General works about the use of parody in motion pictures are entered under [Parody in motion pictures.]
  • Example Notes

    • Note under [Parody in motion pictures]
  • Change Notes

    • 2005-05-20: new
    • 2008-12-18: revised
  • Alternate Formats

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