The Library of Congress > Linked Data Service > LC Subject Headings (LCSH)

First-wave feminism


  • Here are entered works on the feminist movement of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that focused on reform of women's social and legal inequalities, especially on the gaining of women's suffrage.

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    • found: LC database, Mar. 4, 2007(first-wave feminism)
    • found: Wikipedia, Mar. 4, 2007("First-wave feminism refers to a period of feminist activity during the nineteenth and early twentieth century in the United Kingdom and the United States. It focused on de jure (officially mandated) inequalities, primarily on gaining women's suffrage (the right to vote). The term "first-wave" was coined retroactively in the 1970s. The women's movement then, focussing as much on fighting de facto (unofficial) inequalities as de jure ones, acknowledged its foremothers by calling itself "second-wave feminism".")
    • found: Univ. of Montana Women's Center Web site, Mar. 4, 2007("First-wave feminism was the feminist movement in the nineteenth century and early twentieth century, which primarily focused on gaining the right of women's suffrage. The term was not used during the time of the movement and was instead coined retroactively after the term second-wave feminism began to be used to describe a newer feminist movement.")
    • found: Georgetown College Women's Studies Web site, Mar. 4, 2007("This term refers to the first concerted movement working for the reform of women's social and legal inequalities in the nineteenth century. Although individual feminist such as Mary Wollstonecraft had already argued against the injustices suffered by women, it was not until the 1850's that something like an organized feminist movement evolved in Britain. Its headquarters was at Langham Place in London, where a group of middle-class women, led by Barbara Bodichon (1827-91) and Bessie Rayner Parkes (1829-1925), met to discuss topical issues and publish the English Woman's Journal (1858-64). The key concerns of First Wave Feminists were education, employment, the marriage laws, and the plight of intelligent middle-class single women.")
  • General Notes

    • Here are entered works on the feminist movement of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries that focused on reform of women's social and legal inequalities, especially on the gaining of women's suffrage.
  • Change Notes

    • 2008-03-04: new
    • 2008-05-29: revised
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