The Library of Congress > Linked Data Service > LC Subject Headings (LCSH)

Second-wave feminism


  • Here are entered works on the period of feminist thought and activity that began in the 1960s and focused on economic and social equality for women, and on the rights of female minorities.

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  • Sources

    • found: LC database, Mar. 4, 2007(second-wave feminism)
    • found: Wikipedia, Mar. 4, 2007("Second-wave feminism is generally identified with a period beginning in the early nineteen sixties. It is referred to as "second-wave" feminism as social changes tend to occur in waves.[citation needed] Its proponents ascribe its arrival to what they see as the failure of first wave feminism to achieve its aims.")
    • found: Univ. of Montana Women's Center Web site, Mar. 4, 2007("Second-wave feminism refers to a period of feminist thought that originated around the 1960s and was mainly concerned with independence and greater political action to improve women's rights. The second-wave feminist movement was most concerned with items such as economic equality between the genders and addressing the rights of female minorities rather than absolute rights such as suffrage, as first wave feminism had.")
    • found: Georgetown College Women's Studies Web site, Mar. 4, 2007("The term 'Second Wave' was coined by Marsha Lear, and refers to the increase in feminist activity which occurred in America, Britain, and Europe from the late sixties onwards. In America, second wave feminism rose out of the Civil Rights and anti-war movements in which women, disillusioned with their second-class status even in the activist environment of student politics, began to band together to contend against discrimination.")
  • General Notes

    • Here are entered works on the period of feminist thought and activity that began in the 1960s and focused on economic and social equality for women, and on the rights of female minorities.
  • Change Notes

    • 2008-03-04: new
    • 2008-04-04: revised
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