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us: Gothic fiction (Literary genre)


  • Here are entered works on the genre of fiction that combines elements of both horror and romance, featuring psychological and physical terror, the supernatural, castles or monasteries, ghosts, darkness, gloom and doom, etc., usually in a medieval setting. Works on the literary movement that spawned this genre are entered under [Gothic revival (Literature).] Works on literature written in the Gothic language are entered under [Gothic literature.]

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  • Variants

    • us: Gothic horror tales (Literary genre)
    • us: Gothic novels (Literary genre)
    • us: Gothic romances (Literary genre)
    • us: Gothic tales (Literary genre)
    • us: Romances, Gothic (Literary genre)
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  • Sources

    • found: Work cat.: Walpole, H. The Castle of Otranto, c1963: p. 9 (Gothic novel)
    • found: Wikipedia, Feb. 21, 2008: The Castle of Otranto (The Castle of Otranto is a 1764 novel by Horace Walpole. It is generally regarded as the first gothic novel, initiating a literary genre which would become extremely popular in the later 18th century and early 19th century.) Gothic fiction (Gothic fiction is an important genre of literature that combines elements of both horror and romance. Prominent features of Gothic fiction include terror (both psychological and physical), mystery, the supernatural, ghosts, haunted houses and Gothic architecture, castles, darkness, death, decay, doubles, madness, secrets and hereditary curses.)
    • found: Guidelines on subject access to individual works of fiction, drama, etc., 2000 (Gothic fiction. Use for fiction which has a medieval setting and which includes castles and ghosts. UF Gothic novels. BT Historical fiction; Horror fiction; Occult fiction. RT Ghost stories; Love stories; Romantic suspense fiction)
    • found: Baldick, C. The concise Oxford dict. of literary terms, 1990 (Gothic novel or Gothic romance; flourished in Britain from the 1790s to the 1820s)
    • found: Abrams, M.H. A glossary of literary terms, c1999 (Gothic novel, or in an alternative term, Gothic romance; the term "Gothic" has also been extended to a type of fiction which lacks the exotic setting of the earlier romances, but develops a brooding atmosphere of gloom and terror; represents events that are uncanny or macabre or melodramatically violent, and often deals with aberrant psychological states; Gothic fiction)
    • found: Merriam-Webster's encyc. of literature, c1995 (gothic novel. European Romantic, pseudomedieval fiction having a prevailing atmosphere of mystery and terror; in the second half of the 20th century, the term was applied to paperback romances having themes and trappings similar to the original gothic novels)
    • found: Quinn, E. A dict. of literary and thematic terms, c1999 (gothic novel; the traditional setting is a medieval (hence, "Gothic") castle; form from 1760s to the 1830s; resurfaced in the 20th century as the horror film)
    • found: Cuddon, J.A. A dict. of literary terms and literary theory, 1998 (Gothic novel/fiction. A type of romance very popular from the 1760s onwards until the 1820s)
    • found: Harmon, W. A handbook to literature, c2000 (Gothic Novel. A novel in which magic, mystery, and chivalry are the chief characteristics.)
    • found: Encyc. of the novel, c1998 (Gothic novel, or Gothic romance as it was sometimes called)
    • found: LC database, Feb. 21, 2008 (Gothic fiction; Gothic novels; Gothic short fiction; Gothic romances; Gothic tales; Gothic western; Gothic horror; Gothic 'horror' novels; Gothic mystery; Gothic fantasy)
  • General Notes

    • Here are entered works on the genre of fiction that combines elements of both horror and romance, featuring psychological and physical terror, the supernatural, castles or monasteries, ghosts, darkness, gloom and doom, etc., usually in a medieval setting. Works on the literary movement that spawned this genre are entered under [Gothic revival (Literature).] Works on literature written in the Gothic language are entered under [Gothic literature.]
  • Example Notes

    • Notes under [Gothic revival (Literature); Gothic literature]
  • Change Notes

    • 2008-02-21: new
    • 2008-05-29: revised
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