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us: Fishing surveys


  • Here are entered works on surveys, as well as the results of surveys, to determine the numbers and kinds of fish caught by recreational fishers and the amount of effort needed to catch each fish, as well as recreational fisher characteristics, such as length of fishing trip, distance traveled, and fish species sought. Works on surveys or inventories of the fish species found in a specific body of water or region, as well as the results of such surveys, are entered under [Fish surveys.]

  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Variants

    • us: Angler creel surveys
    • us: Angler harvest surveys
    • us: Angler surveys
    • us: Angling surveys
    • us: Creel censusing (Fishing)
    • us: Creel studies (Fishing)
    • us: Creel surveys (Fishing)
    • us: Fisher surveys
  • Broader Terms

  • Narrower Terms

  • Sources

    • found: Hagen, J.E An evaluation of a trout fishery enhancement program in Lake Chelan, 1997: abstr. (creel studies) leaf 1 (creel surveys)
    • found: FAO Fisheries glossary, via WWW, Feb. 3, 2004 (Creel survey: Catch assessment surveys undertaken to estimate the catches made by small scale or recreational fishermen, usually through a sampling program involving interviews and inspection of individual catches in the identified fishing and landing places)
    • found: Alberta Council Creel Survey, via Trout Unlimited Canada Alberta Council home page, Feb. 3, 2004 (Creel surveys estimate angler catch and effort on freshwater systems. Creel survey data is used by fisheries managers to detect trends in fish populations and angler use/preference. This information is also useful for determining many water-body specific and general fishing regulations, as well as helping to identify habitat protection issues.)
    • found: Hudson River Recreational Creel Survey home page, Feb. 3, 2004 (provides the New York State Dept. of Environmental Conservation with necessary data for sound management of the diverse recreational fishery resources in the Hudson River; Normandeau Associates, hired by NYSDEC to conduct the survey, uses several angler counting or contact methods. These include aerial overflights, interviews at boat ramps, marinas, and popular shore fishing sites and attendance at tournament weigh-ins. Throughout the survey period, anglers willing to provide additional information on their fishing trips are requested to answer a mail survey.)
    • found: Creel surveys for sport fishing, via Fisheries and Oceans Canada Pacific Region Recreational Fisheries home page, Feb. 3, 2004 (Creel surveys estimate angler catch and effort on our freshwater systems. The information is used to determine the numbers of fish caught by recreational anglers and the amount of angler effort on the rivers. Creel information can also be used by city Chambers of Commerce to determine benefits to their respective communities from angler dollars. Information that can be gleaned from the surveys include: Number of fish caught, which species, and the time of year they are caught; Number of fish released and the number of marked fish; Number of anglers and the total hours fished; The hatchery contribution to run sizes; Method of fishing (bait/tackle/fly); Run compositions and stock timings. Methods of creel data collection (Depending on the survey design, the creel technicians may collect data using any combination of the following methods): Individual angler interviews--anglers are asked for the number and species of fish caught, kept, and released, if any were fin-clipped, how long they have been fishing or are planning on fishing; Hourly rod counts--creel surveyors count the number of anglers on a representative section of the river every hour on the hour; Effort counts--twice a week, once on a weekday and once on a weekend, total effort counts are conducted to count all the rods on the river. Common methods involve counting from a boat or a plane; Complete census--all anglers on a river are interviewed as they leave the fishing site.)
    • found: Creel surveys, via Queensland Dept. of Primary Industries Fishweb site, Feb. 4, 2003 (A creel survey is an accurate and reliable technique used to obtain information on a fishery. It involves interviewing anglers to collect details about: their catch (species, length, weight); time spent fishing; type of fishing (boat or shore); the distance they have travelled to go fishing. A creel survey gathers information from anglers on what they have caught; The major objective in the management of a recreational fishery is to optimise the number of fish caught by anglers. To work out how many fish, and what kinds are needed for restocking, we must have reliable information about the fish that are being caught right now - and the best way to get this information is to interview anglers. The information we collect allows us to estimate: the total number of anglers using the fishery; the number of fish being harvested; the effort (time) needed to catch each fish; the number of fingerlings stocked for each fish caught; which fish species are there; the proportions in which the different species occur)
    • found: Dauk, P.C. Estimation in creel surveys under non-standard conditions, c2001, via WWW (PDF), viewed Feb. 3, 2004: abstr. (Complemented angler surveys are often used to estimate catch from sport fishers. These surveys consist of two components: one component to estimate catch per unit effort (CPUE) and a second component to estimate effort. Their product is then an estimator for the total catch.) p. 1 (Many of the decisions in recreational fisheries management are based on estimates of catch. Since these decisions can be controversial and have major impact on the viability of the resource, the estimates of catch must be defensible. Such estimates are typically obtained through survey methods, historically known as creel surveys.)
    • found: 2004 Illinois fishing information, via Ill. Dept. of Natural Resources Div. of Fisheries home page, Feb. 3, 2004: p. 59 (Angler creel surveys; A creel survey is one of the most valuable tools available to the fisheries manager, since it provides both angler characteristics and a measure of anglers catch of fish (both harvest and release). Thus, careful analyses and evaluation of creel data indicate the relative success of fisheries management activities and fish stocking efforts. Creel surveys, usually conducted by trained clerks, are designed to provide a great variety of information on fish caught by anglers such as: number of fish caught, catch rate, and length/weight characteristics of fish caught. In addition, angler characteristics such as length of fishing trip, distance traveled and fish species sought are determined from the creel interview.)
    • found: LC database, Feb. 3, 2004 (angler survey; angling survey; sportfishing survey; creel survey; creel and angler surveys; recreational fishery statistics survey; angler harvest survey; fishing survey; sport fishing survey; survey of sportfishing)
    • notfound: Eapen, P.K. Elsevier's dictionary of fisheries, 1999;Defining fisheries : a user's glossary, via WWW, Feb. 3, 2004
  • General Notes

    • Here are entered works on surveys, as well as the results of surveys, to determine the numbers and kinds of fish caught by recreational fishers and the amount of effort needed to catch each fish, as well as recreational fisher characteristics, such as length of fishing trip, distance traveled, and fish species sought. Works on surveys or inventories of the fish species found in a specific body of water or region, as well as the results of such surveys, are entered under [Fish surveys.]
  • Example Notes

    • Note under [Fish surveys]
  • Change Notes

    • 2004-02-03: new
    • 2004-06-22: revised
  • Alternate Formats

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