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us: Impersonation


  • Here are entered works on pretending to be a different person, gender, etc., and works on imitating characteristics, mannerisms, etc. Works on falsely assuming the identity of another person to gain benefit or cause harm to the other person are entered under [False personation.]

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  • Sources

    • found: Baker, R. Drag : a history of female impersonation in the performing arts, c1994.
    • found: Wikipedia, Aug. 1, 2011: (An impersonator is someone who imitates or copies the behavior or actions of another. There are many reasons for someone to be an impersonator, some common ones being as follows: Legally: An entertainer impersonates a celebrity, generally for entertainment, and makes fun of their recent scandals or known behavior patterns. Especially popular objects of impersonation are Elvis, Abraham Lincoln, and Lenin; Illegally: As part of a criminal act such as identity theft. This is usually where the criminal is trying to assume the identity of another, in order to commit fraud, such as accessing confidential information, or to gain property not belonging to them) Personation (Personation (rather than impersonation) is a term used in law for the specific kind of voter fraud where an individual votes in an election, whilst pretending to be a different elector.) Police impersonation (Police impersonation is an act of falsely portraying oneself as a member of the police, for the purpose of deception. In the vast majority of countries the practice is illegal and carries a custodial sentence.)
    • found: The free online dictionary, Aug. 1, 2011 (impersonate: 1. To assume the character or appearance of, especially fraudulently: impersonate a police officer. 2. To imitate the appearance, voice, or manner of; mimic: an entertainer who impersonates celebrities)
  • General Notes

    • Here are entered works on pretending to be a different person, gender, etc., and works on imitating characteristics, mannerisms, etc. Works on falsely assuming the identity of another person to gain benefit or cause harm to the other person are entered under [False personation.]
  • Example Notes

    • Note under [False personation]
  • Change Notes

    • 1986-02-11: new
    • 2011-10-24: revised
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