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Bibframe Work

Title
The reflective journal reflective journal
Type
Text
Subject
Professions.
Professional employees.
Reflective learning.
Career development.
Critical thinking.
Self-knowledge, Theory of.
EDUCATION / Study Skills.
EDUCATION / Professional Development.
SOCIAL SCIENCE / Social Work.
Language
English
Classification
LCC: HD8038.A1 B37 2013 (Source: dlc)
DDC: 650.1 full (Assigner: dlc)
EDU028000 (Source: bisacsh)
EDU046000 (Source: bisacsh)
SOC025000 (Source: bisacsh)
Identified By
Lccn: 2013028831
Content
text (Source: rdacontent)
Summary
"Are you being encouraged to reflect more deeply and critically on what you do? If your answer is yes, this uniquely inspiring book is for you. The Reflective Journal is a thoughtful and encouraging introduction to critically reflective practice. With space to write your reflections, it will give you a place to capture your learning and a structure to record your development. As a powerful tool for processing your thoughts, feelings and actions, it will lead you to a deeper understanding of yourself and your work so that you can develop your practice and achieve your professional goals. Written for students on a range of courses from education and social work to business, counselling and health, it will also be invaluable for those on placement or in professional practice. "-- Provided by publisher.
Table Of Contents
Machine generated contents note:
Introduction And How To Use This Journal
PART I: MODELS AND TOOLS FOR REFLECTION
Theme 1 - Beginnings
1.1. Starting Something New
1.2. The Metaphorical Mirror
1.3. 'Begin With The End In Mind'
1.4. Learning Styles
Activities And Quotes
Theme 2 - Starting To Write Reflectively
2.1. What Does It Mean To Write Reflectively?
2.2. The Role Of Writing In Reflection
2.3. Reflective Writing - How Do I Start?
2.4. A Structure For Reflective Writing
Activities And Quotes
Theme 3 - Learning From Experience
3.1. Driscoll's 'What' Model
3.2. Kolb's Experiential Learning Cycle
3.3. Do We Always Learn From Experience? Jarvis - Learning
3.4. Problematic Experiences Or Positive Ones?
Activities And Quotes
Theme 4 - The Practice Of Reflection
4.1. What Does It Mean To Be A Professional?
4.2. Reflection On Action And Reflection In Action
4.3. Critical Incident Analysis
4.4. Espoused Theories And Theories In Us
Activities And Quotes
Theme 5 - Learning From Feedback
5.1. What Makes Good Feedback?
5.2. Critical Friendship
5.3. The Johari Window
5.4. The Settings Where Feedback Can Occur
Activities And Quotes
Theme 6 - Feelings And Professional Practice
6.1. The Almond Effect
6.2. Transactional Analysis On Memories And Feelings
6.3. Gibbs' Reflective Cycle
6.4. Boud, Keogh And Walker On Attending To Feelings
Activities And Quotes
Theme 7 - Assumptions
7.1. Double Loop Learning
7.2. Reflection, Reflectivity And Reflexivity
7.3. Argyris' Ladder Of Inference
7.4. Mezirow's 7 Levels Of Reflection
Activities And Quotes
Theme 8 - Ethics And Values
8.1. Ethics And Values - What's The Difference?
8.2. Transactional Analysis Drivers
8.3. The Impact Of Values On Professional Work
8.4. Anti-Discriminatory Practice
Activities And Quotes
Theme 9 - Reflecting With Others
9.1. What Is Good Supervision?
9.2. Models Of Supervision
9.3. How To Engage Effectively With Supervision
9.4. The Reflective Conversation
Activities And Quotes
Theme 10 - Bringing It All Together And Moving Forward
10.1. Bassot's Integrated Reflective Cycle
10.2. Managing Change
10.3. From 'Doing Reflection' To 'Reflection As A Way Of Being'
10.4. Senge's Personal Mastery
Activities And Quotes
PART II: MORE SPACE FOR REFLECTION
PART III: CV BUILDING AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT
Further Reading.
Authorized Access Point
Bassot, Barbara. reflective journal