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Bibframe Work

Title
Aerospace actuators
Type
Text
Language
English
Illustrative Content
illustrations
Classification
LCC: TJ840 .M37 2016 (Source: dlc)
DDC: 629.8/042 full
Identified By
Lccn: 2016936925
Content
text (Source: rdacontent)
Summary
"This book is the first of a series of volumes that cover the topic of aerospace actuators following a systems-based approach. This first volume provides general information on actuators and their reliability, and focuses on hydraulically supplied actuators. Emphasis is put on hydraulic power actuators as a technology that is used extensively for all aircraft, including newer aircraft"--Page 4 of cover.
Table Of Contents
Introduction ; Notations and acronyms
Chapter 1. General considerations. 1.1. Power transmission in aircraft ; 1.1.1. Needs and requirements for secondary power and power flows ; 1.1.2. Actuation functions ; 1.1.3. Actuation needs and constraints ; 1.2. Primary and secondary power transmission functions for actuators. 1.2.1. Primary functions ; 1.2.2. Secondary functions ; 1.2.3. Signal approach and power approach ; 1.2.4. Types of actuators ; 1.3. Hydraulic power actuation. 1.3.1. Units and reference values ; 1.3.2. Energy transport by a liquid ; 1.3.3. Historical evolution of power and pressure use ; 1.3.4. Potential advantages and disadvantages of hydraulic technology ; 1.3.5. Overall hydraulic circuit architecture
Chapter 2. Reliability. 2.1. Risk and risk acceptance ; 2.2. Response to failure. 2.2.1. Resistance to failure ; 2.2.2. Tolerance to failure ; 2.2.3. Examples ; 2.3. Redundancy. 2.3.1. Static redundancy ; 2.3.2. Dynamic redundancy ; 2.4. Feared events and failure rates in actuation ; 2.5. Fundamentals of reliability calculation. 2.5.1. Variables used in reliability calculation ; 2.5.2. Generic failure rate models ; 2.5.3. Reliability of element associations ; 2.6. Short glossary of technical terms pertaining to reliability
Chapter 3. Hydraulic fluid and its conditioning. 3.1. Needs and constraints. 3.1.1. Opportunities and constraints in hydrostatic power transmission ; 3.1.2. Actual hydraulic fluid ; 3.1.3. Physical properties ; 3.2. Fluid conditioning. 3.2.1. Fluid in sufficient quantity ; 3.2.2. Pressurization and charging ; 3.2.3. Filtration ; 3.2.4. Thermal management ; 3.2.5. External leakage collection ; 3.3. Monitoring and maintaining the fluid in working conditions. 3.3.1. Fluid quantity ; 3.3.2. Cleanliness ; 3.3.3. Pressurization - depressurization ; 3.3.4. Examples ; 3.4. Energy phenomena caused by the fluid. 3.4.1. Hydraulic resistance ; 3.4.2. Hydraulic capacitance ; 3.4.3. Hydraulic inertia ; 3.4.4. Speed of sound in the hydraulic fluid
Chapter 4. Hydromechanical power transformation. 4.1. Hydromechanical power transformation ; 4.2. Functional perspective ; 4.3. Technological shortcomings. 4.3.1. Energy losses ; 4.3.2. Compressibility of the hydraulic fluid ; 4.3.3. Wall deformation ; 4.3.4. Pulsations ; 4.3.5. Drainage ; 4.4. Pump driving. 4.4.1. Driving performed by main engines : engine driven pump (EDP) ; 4.4.2. Driving performed by an electric motor : electro mechanical pump (EMP) or alternative current motor pump (ACMP) ; 4.4.3. Driving performed by an hydraulic motor : power transfer unit (PTU) ; 4.4.4. Dynamic air driving : ram air turbine (RAT) or air driven pump (ADP) ; 4.4.5. Driving performed by a gas turbine : solid propellant gas generator (SPGG) or monofuel emergency power unit (MEPU) ; 4.4.6. Fluid supply under pressure
Chapter 5. Power metering in hydraulics. 5.1. Power metering principles ; 5.2. Power-on-demand. 5.2.1. Metering by pump drive adjustment ; 5.2.2. Metering by displacement adjustment 5.3. Metering by hydraulic restriction. 5.3.1. Functional configuration ; 5.3.2. Types of distraction ; 5.4. Impact on restriction configuration and properties on the metering function. 5.4.1. Fixed hydraulic restriction ; 5.4.2. Variable hydraulic restriction ; 5.5. Servovalves. 5.5.1. Architecture ; 5.5.2. Incremental improvements of servovalve performances ; 5.5.3. Power supply of the electromagnetic motor ; 5.5.4. Concepts of pilot stages ; 5.5.5. Direct drive valve
Chapter 6. Power management in hydraulics. 6.1. Power distribution ; 6.2. Providing power. 6.2.1. Transporting fluid ; 6.2.2. Isolating ; 6.2.3. Sequencing user power supplies ; 6.2.4. Merging sources ; 6.2.5. Sharing sources ; 6.2.6. Storing/restoring energy ; 6.2.7. Adjusting the pressure level ; 6.3. Protecting. 6.3.1. Protecting against overpressure/overload ; 6.3.2. Protecting against cavitation and desorption ; 6.3.3. Protecting against over-consumptions ; 6.4. Managing the load. 6.4.1. Locking the load in position ; 6.4.2. Ensuring irreversibility ; 6.4.3. Releasing the load ; 6.4.4. Damping the load
Chapter 7. Architectures and geometric integration of hydraulically-supplied actuators. 7.1. Introduction ; 7.2. Arrangement of actuation functions ; 7.3. Architecture an routing of hydraulic power networks. 7.3.1. Architecture ; 7.3.2. Routing ; 7.4. Integration of components and equipment. 7.4.1. In-line integration ; 7.4.2. Manifold integration ; 7.4.3. Sub-system integration ; 7.5. Integration of actuators in the airframe. 7.5.1. Controls ; 7.5.2. Structural integration ; Bibliography ; Index.
Authorized Access Point
Maré, Jean-Charles, Aerospace actuators. 1, Needs, reliability and hydraulic power solutions