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Bibframe Work

Title
Evolution's bite Evolution's bite :
Type
Text
Subject
Human evolution.
Teeth--Evolution.
Dental anthropology.
Nutritional anthropology.
Prehistoric peoples--Food.
Diet--History.
Fossil hominids.
Teeth, Fossil.
Diet--history.
Paleontology--methods.
Biological Evolution.
Hominidae.
Paleodontology--methods.
SCIENCE / Life Sciences / Evolution.
SCIENCE / Life Sciences / Human Anatomy & Physiology.
SCIENCE / Life Sciences / Developmental Biology.
Dental anthropology.
Diet.
Fossil hominids.
Human evolution.
Nutritional anthropology.
Prehistoric peoples--Food.
Teeth--Evolution.
Teeth, Fossil.
Frühmensch
Zahn
Ernährung
Hominisation
Paläanthropologie
Genre Form
History. fst01411628 (Source: OCoLC)
Language
English
Illustrative Content
illustrations
Classification
2017 F-512 (Source: dnlm)
GN 281.4 (Source: dnlm)
LCC: GN281.4 .U54 2017 (Source: dlc)
Identified By
Lccn: 2016960239
Content
text (Source: rdacontent)
Summary
Ungar describes how a tooth's "foodprints"--Distinctive patterns of microscopic wear and tear--provide telltale details about what an animal actually ate in the past. These clues, combined with groundbreaking research in paleoclimatology, demonstrate how a changing climate altered the food options available to our ancestors, what Ungar calls the biospheric buffet. When diets change, species change, and Ungar traces how diet and an unpredictable climate determined who among our ancestors was winnowed out and who survived, as well as why we transitioned from the role of forager to farmer. By sifting through the evidence--and the scars on our teeth--Ungar makes the important case for what might or might not be the most natural diet for humans.
Table Of Contents
Introduction
How teeth work
How teeth are used
Out of the garden
Our changing world
Foodprints
What made us human
The Neolithic revolution
Victims of our own success.
Authorized Access Point
Ungar, Peter S., Evolution's bite