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Bibframe Work

Title
An evaluation of the Department of Defense's excess property program
Type
Text
Subject
United States. Department of Defense--Rules and practice.
Surplus military property, American.
Government property--United States.
Police--Equipment and supplies--Purchasing--United States.
Language
English
Illustrative Content
illustrations
maps
Geographic Coverage
United States
Identified By
Lccn: 2018289218
Content
text (Source: rdacontent)
Summary
The Defense Logistics Agency's (DLA's) Law Enforcement Support Office (LESO) provides excess Department of Defense property--everything from desks to rifles to airplanes--to local, state, tribal, and federal law enforcement agencies (LEAs) across the United States. Because of the sensitive nature of some of the material transferred to LEAs, LESO has been the subject of congressional, Government Accountability Office, and public scrutiny for almost two decades. Recent events--including the 2014 Ferguson, Missouri, protests--increased interest in the program. Opponents of the program argued that LESO was at least partially responsible for what they perceived to be an increased militarization of the police, while proponents believed that this program not only made police and citizens safer but exemplified good stewardship of taxpayer dollars. The 2017 National Defense Authorization Act required an evaluation of the LESO program, which provides thousands of LEAs with millions of dollars of excess property annually. The authors of this report find that LESO manages an efficient program that effectively reuses excess property, benefits the law enforcement community, responds diligently to oversight, and is faithful to congressional intent. However, these efforts are unlikely to resolve perceptions that the program contributes to the militarization of police. Defining what is or is not appropriate militarization of police forces and addressing concerns of how the excess property is employed and its effect on community policing is beyond the authority of DLA. This report presents three optional paths ahead.
Table Of Contents
Introduction
Excess Property and LESO Program Processes
Transfers, Losses, Suspensions, Terminations, and Rebuys
Stakeholder Interviews
Public Perceptions
Optional Paths Ahead
Appendix A: Executive Order 13688
Appendix B: Executive Order 13809
Appendix C: Standardized Interview Protocol for State Coordinators and State POCs
Appendix D: Standardized Interview Protocol for LEA Officials.
Authorized Access Point
Davenport, Aaron. evaluation of the Department of Defense's excess property program
Authorized Access Point Variant
Welburn, Jonathan William. evaluation of the Department of Defense's excess property program
Lauland, Andrew. evaluation of the Department of Defense's excess property program
Pietenpol, Annelise. evaluation of the Department of Defense's excess property program
Robbins, Marc L., 1954- evaluation of the Department of Defense's excess property program
Rebhan, Erin. evaluation of the Department of Defense's excess property program
Boren, Patricia M., 1955- evaluation of the Department of Defense's excess property program
Riley, Kevin Jack, 1964- evaluation of the Department of Defense's excess property program
Acquisition and Technology Policy Center. evaluation of the Department of Defense's excess property program
Rand Corporation. National Security Research Division. evaluation of the Department of Defense's excess property program
Rand Corporation. evaluation of the Department of Defense's excess property program
United States. Defense Logistics Agency. evaluation of the Department of Defense's excess property program