The Library of Congress > Linked Data Service > LC Name Authority File (LCNAF)

Abel, Annie Heloise, 1873-1947


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  • Variants

    • Abel, Anna Heloise, 1873-1947
    • Abel-Henderson, Annie Heloise, 1873-1947
    • Henderson, Annie Heloise Abel, 1873-1947
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  • Sources

    • found: Her The American Indian in the Civil War, 1992:t.p. (Annie Heloise Abel) p. 6 (b. in England, 1873; moved to Kansas, about 1885; grad. U. Kansas; Yale, Ph.D, 1905; m. Mr. Henderson, about 1921, in Australia; known as Annie Heloise Abel-Henderson for a short time)
    • found: Her The American Indian as participant the Civil War, 1993:CIP t.p. (Annie Heloise Abel) data sheet (1873-1947)
    • found: United States. Office of Indian Affairs. The official correspondence of James S. Calhoun, 1915:t.p. (Annie Heloise Abel)
    • found: Her Indian reservations in Kansas, 1903:t.p. (Anna Heloise Abel)
    • found: FamilySearch, via WWW, June 11, 2008(Annie Heloise Abel; b. 18 Feb. 1873, Fernhurst, England; dau. of George Abel and Amelia Anne Hodgen; d. 14 Mar. 1947)
    • found: Find a Grave, via WWW, June 11, 2008(Annie Heloise Abel; historian; b. Feb. 18, 1873, Fernhurst, England; d. Mar. 14, 1947; interred at Montesano, Washington)
    • found: Australian dictionary of biography, via WWW, June 16, 2008(Annie Heloise Abel m. George Cockburn Henderson (1870-1944), Oct. 27, 1922; marriage later dissolved)
    • found: MWA/NAIP files, June 16, 2008(hdg.: Abel, Annie Heloise, 1873-1947; usage: Annie Heloise Abel; Anna Heloise Abel; variant: Annie Heloise Abel-Henderson; Annie Heloise Abel Henderson)
    • found: Washington State University Libraries Manuscripts, Archives, and Special Collections, Washington State University (website), viewed July 6, 2021:Guide to the Annie Abel-Henderson Papers 1860-1939, Cage 246 (Doctor Annie Heloise Abel Henderson [1873-1947] was undoubtedly one of the ablest women historians of her day. Honors came to her early in her career, for her doctoral dissertation on "The History of Events, Resulting in Indian Consolidation West of the Mississippi" won her the coveted Justin Winsor prize bestowed upon her by the American Historical Association in 1906. Throughout her scholarly career native policies of the British and American governments constituted her chief but not sole interest. The Slave Holding Indians, a large three-volume tome, was published during the ten-year period 1915-1925 and is considered by most historians as her crowning achievement. One of her most interesting assignments she set for herself, however, was to track down the journal of Pierre Antoine Tabeau. In her pursuit of this treasure, she revealed all of the patience, astuteness, and penetrating powers of deduction expected only of a Sherlock Holmes or G-man. On one occasion a class in Pacific Northwest history had the good fortune to hear her tell her experiences on the trail of this significant document. Several students were so interested that they requested the opportunity to meet her later and get more of her stories about these treasure hunts. Inclined to be somewhat formal in her public appearances, she was definitely at her best in a small circle of kindred spirits. Retirement from teaching did not stop her researches and professional work. Her book reviews were models of critical analysis.) - http://ntserver1.wsulibs.wsu.edu/masc/finders/cg246.htm
  • Change Notes

    • 1980-07-01: new
    • 2021-07-19: revised
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