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Star-spangled banner (Song)


  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Work Begun

    • (edtf) 1814
  • Form

    • (lcgft) National anthems
    • http://id.loc.gov/authorities/genreForms/gf2017026028
  • Variants

    • American national anthem
    • O say can you see by the dawn's early light
    • National anthem (U.S.)
  • Additional Related Forms

  • Exact Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Closely Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Sources

    • found: The star-spangled banner, 1943.
    • found: New Grove:under Smith, John Stafford (The Star-spangled banner; based on the song To Anacreon in heaven by Smith)
    • found: Fuld, James J. The book of world-famous music, 2000:p. 529-534 (The star spangled banner; opening words: "O say can you see by the dawn's early light" from poem by Francis Scott Key, 1814; inspired by watching the English bombardment of Fort McHenry in 1814, the melody originally known as the Anacreontic song which had opening words "To Anacreon, in heav'n, where he sat in full glee," probably published 1779-1780; "It has recently been established that John Stafford Smith was the composer of the music.")
    • found: New Grove, 2nd ed. on line:(under: Smith, John Stafford: The song by John Stafford Smith called To Anacreon in heaven, was composed for a drinking and singing club; he published a harmonized version (A,T,B) in his 5th Book of Canzonets, catches, canons and glees (1799). In much altered form, this was later adapted to The star-spangled banner, now the national anthem of the USA)
    • found: Wikipedia, February 18, 2020("The Star-Spangled Banner" is the national anthem of the United States; lyrics come from the Defence of Fort M'Henry, a poem written on September 14, 1814, by the then 35-year-old lawyer and amateur poet Francis Scott Key; poem was set to the tune of a popular British song written by John Stafford Smith for the Anacreontic Society, a men's social club in London. "To Anacreon in Heaven" (or "The Anacreontic Song"); was recognized for official use by the United States Navy in 1889, and by U.S. President Woodrow Wilson in 1916, and was made the national anthem by a congressional resolution on March 3, 1931 (46 Stat. 1508, codified at 36 U.S.C. ʹ 301), which was signed by President Herbert Hoover; Key gave the poem to his brother-in-law Joseph H. Nicholson who saw that the words fit the popular melody "The Anacreontic Song", by English composer John Stafford Smith. Nicholson took the poem to a printer in Baltimore, who anonymously made the first known broadside printing on September 17)
  • Editorial Notes

    • [URIs added to this record for the PCC URI MARC Pilot. Please do not remove or edit the URIs.]
  • Change Notes

    • 1981-05-06: new
    • 2020-04-14: revised
  • Alternate Formats