The Library of Congress > Linked Data Service > LC Name Authority File (LCNAF)

Maginn, William, 1793-1842


  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Variants

    • O'Doherty, Morgan, Sir, 1793-1842
    • Maginn, Dr. (William), 1793-1842
    • Officer of the line, 1793-1842
    • Author of The military sketch book, 1793-1842
    • Military sketch book, Author of the, 1793-1842
  • Additional Information

    • Exact Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

    • Closely Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

    • Sources

      • found: His Maxims of Sir Morgan O'Doherty, 1849:t.p. (Sir Morgan O'Doherty)
      • found: His The military sketch-book, 1831:t.p. (An officer of the line)
      • found: His Miscellaneous writings of the late Dr. Maginn, 1855-57:t.p. (Dr. Maginn)
      • found: His Tales of military life, 1834:t.p. (Author of The military sketch book) [Info. from InU]
      • found: William Maginn and the British press, 2013:ECIP data view (b. 1794; d. 1842), journalist and miscellaneous writer, born at Cork, became a contributor to Blackwood's Magazine, and after moving to London in 1824 became for a few months in 1826 the Paris correspondent to The Representative, a paper started by John Murray, the publisher; he helped to found in 1827 the ultra Tory Standard, a newspaper that he edited along with a fellow graduate of Trinity College, Dublin, Stanley Lees Giffard; he also wrote for the more scandalous Sunday paper, The Age; In 1830 he instigated and became one of the leading supporters of Fraser's Magazine; his Homeric ballads, much praised by contemporary critics, were published in Fraser's between 1839 and 1842;in 1837, Bentley's Miscellany was launched, with Charles Dickens as editor, and Maginn wrote the prologue and contributed over the next several years a series of "Shakespeare Papers" that examined characters in counter-intuitive fashion; from "The Man in the Bell" (Blackwood's, 1821) through "Welch Rabbits" (Bentley's, 1842) he was an occasional though skillful writer of short fiction and tales; his only novel, "Whitehall" (1827) pretends to be an historical novel set in 1820s England written in the year 2227; it is a droll spoof of the vogue for historical novels as well as the contemporary political scene)
    • LC Classification

      • PR4972.M3
    • Change Notes

      • 1983-07-13: new
      • 2013-01-22: revised
    • Alternate Formats