The Library of Congress > Linked Data Service > LC Name Authority File (LCNAF)

Seattle, Chief, 1786?-1866


  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Variants

    • Se'ahl, Chief, 1786?-1866
    • Sealth, Chief, 1786?-1866
    • Sealth, Noah, 1786?-1866
    • Seathl, Chief, 1786?-1866
    • Seatlh, Chief, 1786?-1866
    • Seattle, Chefe, 1786?-1866
    • Seattle, Chief, 1790-1866
    • Seattle, Chief of the Suquamish and allied tribes, d. 1866
    • Si'ahl, Chief, 1786?-1866
    • Siʻał, Chief, 1786?-1866
    • 西雅图, 酋长, 1786?-1866
  • Additional Information

    • Birth Date

        (edtf) 1786?
    • Death Date

        (edtf) 1866-06-07
    • Descriptor

        Duwamish Indians
    • Descriptor

        Suquamish Indians
    • Birth Place

        (lcsh) Puget Sound Region (Wash.)
    • Birth Place

        (fast) Washington (State)--Puget Sound Regionhttp://id.worldcat.org/fast/1351353
    • Death Place

        Port Madison (Wash.)
    • Associated Locale

        United States
    • Associated Locale

        Suquamish Indian Tribe of the Port Madison Reservation, Washington
    • Associated Locale

        Duwamish Tribe
    • Associated Locale

        Washington (State)
    • Gender

        Males
    • Occupation

  • Identified By

    • Identified By

      • Identified By

        • Identified By

          • Identified By

            • Use For

              • n86870174
            • Exact Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

            • Closely Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

            • Earlier Established Forms

              • Seattle, Chief of the Suquamish and allied tribes, d. 1866
              • Seattle, Chief, 1790-1866
            • Sources

              • found: How can one sell the air? 1984:p. 1 (Chief Seattle) p. 27, etc. (Sealth, chief of the Suquamish and Duwamish people, d. 1866)
              • found: LC in WLN, 11-2-84(hdg.: Seattle, Chief of the Suquamish and allied tribes, d. 1866; usage: Chief Seathl)
              • found: LC data base, 11/30/84(hdg.: Seattle, Chief of the Suquamish and allied tribes, d. 1866; usage: Chief Seattle; Chief Seathl; Sealth; Chefe Seattle)
              • found: Dict. of Indians of North America, 1978(Seattle, 1790-1866, Suquamish Indian chief; held the position of "Chief of the Allied Tribes")
              • found: A concise dict. of Indian tribes of North America, 1979(the great chief Seatlh (Seattle); index: Seatlh, Chief)
              • found: NUCMC data from Univ. Wash. Lib. for DeShaw, W. Papers, 1852-1892(Chief Sealth)
              • found: Warren, J.R. Seattle, c1981(Chief Seattle; of Suquamish & Duwamish tribes; defended salt-water tribes; Catholic; friend of pioneers; s. of Schweabe; b. 1786; d. 1866; city of Seattle namesake)
              • found: nuc86-110263: His Your dead cease to love you, 1976(hdg. on CU-BANC rept.: Sealth, Noah; usage: Chief Noah Sealth)
              • found: DAB(Seattle; ca. 1786-6/7/1866; sometimes, probably erroneously, said baptismal name was Noah Sealth)
              • found: American National Biography online, October 14, 2021(Seattle (1786?-07 June 1866), leader of the Coast Salish-speaking Duwamish tribe of east central Puget Sound, was born near present-day Seattle, Washington, the son of Schweabe, a Suquamish headman, and Scho-lit-za, who was reported to be a slave of Schweabe. All sources claim that in his early years he lived west of present-day Seattle along Puget Sound in a Suquamish longhouse that was occupied by several families; was given a Roman Catholic burial in his Suquamish birthplace; Chief Seattle) - https://www.anb.org/view/10.1093/anb/9780198606697.001.0001/anb-9780198606697-e-2000920
              • found: Wikipedia, October 14, 2021(Chief Seattle (c. 1786 - June 7, 1866); Suquamish and Duwamish chief; born some time between 1780 and 1786 on the Black River near Kent, Washington; died Port Madison, Washington, U.S.; namesake of Seattle, Washington)
              • found: Chief Seattle, via The Suquamish Tribe website, via the Internet Archive wayback machine, viewed October 14, 2021(Chief Seattle; siʻał (Seattle) [on source, the ayn (ʻ) appears as the International Phonetic Alphabet character for glottal stop]; was an ancestral leader of the Suquamish Tribe; signed the 1855 Treaty of Point Elliott with the United States, agreeing to live on the Port Madison Indian Reservation and give up title to the remainder of Suquamish lands; born around 1786; died in 1866 in Suquamish; the popular spellings of siʻał names, Seattle and Sealth; the Treaty of Point Elliott, recorded 35 years earlier, shows his name as Seattle. The Suquamish Tribe does not object to the use of either name) - https://web.archive.org/web/20180725070940/https://suquamish.nsn.us/home/about-us/chief-seattle/
              • found: Chief Si'ahl, via Duwamish Tribe website, October 14, 2021(Chief Si'ahl; the name "Seattle" is an Anglicization of Si'ahl (1780-1866); it is said that Si'ahl was born at his mother's village of Stukw on the Black River, in what is now the city of Kent) - https://www.duwamishtribe.org/chief-siahl
              • found: HistoryLink, via WWW, October 14, 2021(Chief Seattle (Seattle, Chief Noah (born Si?al 178?-1866)); Chief Seattle, or si?al in his native Lushootseed language, led the Duwamish and Suquamish Tribes as the first Euro-American settlers arrived in the greater Seattle area in the 1850s; baptized Noah by Catholic missionaries; retired to the Suquamish Reservation at Port Madison, and died there on June 7, 1866; born on the Kitsap peninsula some time in the 1780s; Chief Seattle's name is sometimes written Se'ahl and the ' is another type of glottal stop) - https://www.historylink.org/File/5071
            • Editorial Notes

              • [Machine-derived non-Latin script reference project.]
              • [Non-Latin script reference not evaluated.]
              • [URIs added to 3XX and/or 5XX fields in this record for the PCC URI MARC Pilot. Please do not remove or edit these URIs.]
            • Change Notes

              • 1984-12-14: new
              • 2021-10-16: revised
            • Alternate Formats