The Library of Congress > Linked Data Service > LC Name Authority File (LCNAF)

Foxe, John, 1516-1587. Actes and monuments


  • URI(s)

  • Instance Of

  • Components

    • Foxe, John, 1516-1587.
    • Actes and monuments
  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Work Begun

    • (edtf) 1563
  • Work Locale

    • (naf) London (England)
  • Form

    • (lcsh) Martyrologies
    • (lcsh) Protestant literature
  • Form

    • (lcgft) Martyrologies
  • Variants

    • Foxe, John, 1516-1587. Acts and monuments
    • Foxe, John, 1516-1587. Foxe's Christian martyrs of the world
    • Foxe, John, 1516-1587. Christian martyrs of the world
    • Foxe, John, 1516-1587. Foxe's Book of English martyrs
    • Foxe, John, 1516-1587. Book of English martyrs
    • Foxe, John, 1516-1587. Fox's Book of martyrs
    • Foxe, John, 1516-1587. Book of martyrs
    • Foxe, John, 1516-1587. Foxe's Book of martyrs
    • Actes and monuments
    • Book of English martyrs
  • Use For

  • Exact Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Closely Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Sources

    • found: His Actes and monuments of matters most special and memorable ... 1596.
    • found: InU/Wing STC files(variants: Acts and monuments of matters most special and memorable ...; Foxe's Book of English martyrs; Foxe's Christian martyrs of the world; Fox's Book of martyrs; The acts and monuments of John Fox)
    • found: DNB(under Foxe, John: Actes and monuments, known popularly as The book of martyrs)
    • found: Foxe's Book of martyrs ... c1998.
    • found: LC data base, 5/27/85(hdg.: Foxe, John, 1516-1587. Actes and monuments)
    • found: Foxe, John. Actes and monuments of these latter and perillous dayes, 1563, viewed online 19 December 2017:title page (Actes and monuments of these latter and perillous dayes, touching matters of the Church, wherein ar comprehended and described the great persecutions & horrible troubles, that haue bene wrought and practised by the Romishe Prelates, speciallye in this Realme of England and Scotlande, from the yeare of our Lorde a thousande, vnto the tyme nowe present. Gathered and collected according to the true copies & wrytinges certificatorie, as wel of the parties them selues that suffered, as also out of the Bishops Registers, which wer the doers therof, by Iohn Foxe) last page (colophon: Imprinted at London by Iohn Day dwellyng ouer Aldersgate, beneth saynt Martins, Anno 1563 the 20th of March)
    • found: Oxford dictionary of national biography, 24 August 2017:Foxe, John, 1516/17-1587 (Acts and Monuments, immediately and universally referred to as Foxe's "Book of martyrs"; the word "author" needs to be used with some care: essentially a collaborative undertaking, built on material collected by Bale, Grindal, Bull, and Parker, as well as on Foxe's own researches, with the assistance of copyists as well as of the many people who did fieldwork for him, poring over local records or interviewing their neighbours; Foxe did not actually write the words of much of the work, but as the person who shaped the text and controlled its messages, Foxe is the undisputed author; first edition published by John Day 20 March 1563; the bulk of the work covers church history from Wyclif until the accession of Elizabeth, but an introductory section provides an overview of church history, particularly papal history, from the year 1000; while English history predominates, considerable attention is given to continental history; wide range of sources; the second edition, printed in 1570: incorporated much of the first edition but was rewritten so thoroughly as to constitute a separate and distinct work; considerably extended scope, with more coverage of the pre-Reformation church and events in Europe; greater breadth of research and range of sources; passages shared between the first and second editions were systematically rewritten; corrections and cross-references; a great deal of material from the first edition was not reprinted; a considerable amount of very significant material in the early editions of Foxe's book was not carried over either to the later editions or to the Victorian editions, which were largely based on the 1583 edition; third edition (colophon 27 June 1576): not just a reprint of the second edition; information from oral sources was added to the sections dealing with Mary's reign and the beginning of Elizabeth's; fourth edition printed October 1583: more archival material and additional oral testimony; some of the material excised from earlier editions was restored; material was deleted; the cross-references, which had hitherto been updated in each succeeding edition, were not revised, so the notes in the fourth edition referred readers to the relevant pages in the third edition; the fourth edition was the last edition of Acts and Monuments to appear in Foxe's lifetime; five further unabridged editions of the work appeared in the next 101 years; each contained significant additions of material reflecting the different agendas of its editors; remained a living and evolving text long after Foxe was dead; today is considered at once both the most important narrative source for the English Reformation and a work that helped to shape its later development; background: John Bale loaned Foxe valuable manuscripts and certainly encouraged, very probably guided, Foxe in the composition of his first martyrology, had a profound influence on Foxe's martyrologies; first martyrology (1554); second Latin martyrology, Rerum in ecclesia gestarum ... commentarii (1559): scope mainly restricted to English men and women who died for the gospel, but planned a further volume or volumes on the sufferings of Protestant martyrs on the continent; Foxe lived in London 1559-1587)
    • found: The Oxford encyclopedia of the Reformation, 1996, viewed online 30 August 2017:Foxe, John (Foxe, John (1517-1587), English Protestant church historian; his greatest published work, Actes and Monuments, was popularly called The Book of Martyrs; great influence on the religious self-consciousness of England as a largely Protestant nation; as a church history, it was nearly universal in its scope but drew particular attention to the persecution of English Protestants in the reign of Mary Tudor; had already published (at Strasbourg in 1554) a modest book in Latin called Commentarii rerum in ecclesia gestarum, which drew the attention of a Continental readership to the significance of events in England from the time of John Wycliffe up to the early sixteenth century; in 1559 he published in Basel an extended edition of this work, bringing the story forward to the reign of Mary; Foxe organized the materials that in 1563 appeared as Actes and Monuments of these Latter and Perilous Days, a huge folio of eighteen hundred pages, and three times the length of the 1559 book; the 1570 edition, twice the length of the 1563 edition, was nearly the definitive version, although it would be followed by further printings, with additions and rearrangements, in 1576 and 1583 (the text used by Foxe's Victorian editors); the fifth and final Elizabethan edition appeared in 1596, after the author's death)
    • found: King, John N. Foxe's Book of martyrs and early modern print culture, 2006:title page (Foxe's Book of martyrs) Contents, page vii (The books of martyrs: First edition (1563); Second edition (1570); Third edition (1576); Fourth edition (1583); Bright's Abridgment (1589); Fifth and sixth editions (1596-97 and 1610); Abridgements by Cotton, Mason, and Taylor (1613-16); Seventh edition (1631-32); Eighth edition (1641) and mid-seventeenth-century selections; Ninth edition (1684)) page 21 (compelling evidence that Foxe functioned in the manner of an auctor or compilator, who accumulated an extraordinary aggregation of disparate documents that he set forth in annals fashion; D.R. Woolf thinks [erroneously in King's view] that Foxe was the author of this history) page 23 (collaboration with a variety of editors and collaborators including Henry Bull, John Bale, Edmund Grindal, and many others; each of the four editions overseen by Foxe and John Day consists not of a single ever-expanding book, but of four distinctive constructions that respond to Roman Catholic criticism and the shifting religio-political milieu of the reign of Elizabeth I; the 1563 verson, in particular, draws heavily upon translation of material that Foxe had compiled for Latin precursors published in 1554 and 1559)
  • Change Notes

    • 1985-06-05: new
    • 2017-12-21: revised
  • Alternate Formats