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Morley, Frances Parker, Countess of, 1781-1857


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    • Parker, Frances, Countess of Morley, 1781-1857
    • Talbot, Frances, 1782-1857
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      • found: The royal intellectual bazaar, a prospectus of a plan for the improvement of the fashionable circle, 1832
      • found: Dacre: a novel, 1834:title page (edited by The Countess of Morley)
      • found: BL RS&CD, 14 Apr. 1999(Frances Parker, Countess of Morley)
      • found: Dictionary of anonymous and pseudonymous English literature, 1926:(ROYAL (the) intellectual bazaar; a prospectus of a plan for the improvement of the fashionable circle. [By Frances Parker, Dowager Countess of Morley.] [W.; Martin's Cat.] 1832)
      • found: Modern English biography, containing many thousand concise memoirs of persons who have died since the year 1850, 1897:(Morley, Frances Parker, Countess of; daughter of Thomas Talbot of Wymondham, Norfolk; born 1781; celebrated as a woman of wit and the "first of talkers;" a painter; married 23 August 1809, as his second wife, John Parker 1 Earl of Morley (born 1772, died 14 March 1840); lithographed the plates in Portraits of the Spruggins family, arranged by Richard Sucklethumkin Spruggins, 1829; author of The flying burgermaster, a legend of the Black Forest, 1832 anon; The royal intellectual bazaar, a prospectus of a plan for the improvement of the fashionable circle, 1832 anon; The man without a name, 2 vols., 1852; edited Dacre, a novel, 3 vols., 1834; died Saltram, Plympton 6 Dec 1857; burried in family vault at Plympton St. Mary)
      • found: British women poets of the Romantic era; an anthology, 1997:page 483-484 (Countess of Morley (1781-1857); born Frances Talbot in 1781; on 22 August 1809 she became the second wife of John Parker, baron of Morley; in 1815 he was made Vicount Boringdon and earl of Morley; during the 1830s the family lived in London at Kent-house, in the South Place, Knightsbridge, and had a country home, Boringdon-house, in Saltram, Deveonshire; the countess' literary works include Dacre, a silver-fork novel published in three volumes by Longmans in 1834; the title page lists her merely as the editor, but such as subterfuge was common in this period, and the book was widely known to have been her work; other novels include A Man Without a Name (1852), Nina (c. 1850), and possibly The Divorced and Family Records; she is also said to have written proverbs and comedies; she had previously printed, interleaved with illustrations, two verse pamphets, The Nose, a Poem in Six Stanzas...Dedicated to All Unmarried Ladies Who May Profit by the Example, and Take Warning from the Fate of Dorothy Spriggins (1831) and The Flying Burgermaster, A Legend of the Black Forest (1832 ), and she was probably the author of Some Account of Lord Boringdon's Accident ([1818]); Walter Sneyd's Portraits of the Spruggins Family (1829) contains her lithographs; the countess of Morley died at Saltram on 6 December 1857 at the age of seventy-six; she is said to have left a large collection of paintings)
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      • 1999-04-14: new
      • 2021-06-15: revised
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