The Library of Congress > Linked Data Service > LC Subject Headings (LCSH)

Centos


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    • Cento verse
    • Collage poems
    • Mosaic poems
    • Patchwork poems
    • Patchwork poetry
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  • Sources

    • found: Arterian, D. Death centos, 2013.
    • found: Buchanan, R. Centos : patchwork poetry, 200-.
    • found: Ugly Duckling Presse website, Mar. 26, 2014:Diana Arterian: Death Centos ("Arterian employs the ancient framework of the cento--a collage form that borrows the language of other authors--to mine the last words of a hundred people, mixing historical figures and death-row inmates through a weaving of their immortal utterances.")
    • found: Drury, J. The poetry dictionary, 2006(Cento: A poem made up of passages from poems by one or more authors; a patchwork of quotations; a literary collage; a pastiche (in the sense of being a mixture of poetic excerpts))
    • found: Harmon, W. A handbook to literature, 2006(Cento: A literary patchwork, usually in verse, made up of scraps from one or many authors. An example is a fifth-century life of Christ by the Empress Eudoxia, which is in verse with every line drawn from Homer)
    • found: Cuddon, J.A. A dictionary of literary terms and literary theory, 1991(Cento: A collection of bits and pieces from various writers. A patchwork poem made up of verses by different writers. Such works were common in later antiquity (e.g. Falconia Proba dedicated to Honorius a Cento Vergilianus dealing with events of the Old and New Testaments). Perhaps the most outstanding example of a cento is that by Decimus Magnus Ausonius (c. AD 310-90))
    • found: The new Princeton encyclopedia of poetry and poetics, 1993(Cento: A verse composition made up of lines selected from the work or works of some great poet(s) of the past. Homer largely served the purpose in Gr. lit., ranging from the adaptations by Trygaeus of various lines in the Iliad and Odyssey reported by Aristophanes (Peace 1090-94) to the Homerokentrones of the Byzantine period. Similarly, Virgil was the most popular source for centos in the later Roman times)
    • found: Poetry Magnum Opus online, Mar. 27, 2014(Cento Verse: Latin for patchwork, verse made up of a medley of lines from the work or works of some well known poet. Verse in this genre dates back to ancient Rome.)
    • found: Glossary of poetic terms, via Poets' graves online, Mar. 27, 2014(Cento: A patchwork poem composed of quotations from other authors. A famous example is Cento Nuptialus by Decimus Magnus Ausonius)
    • found: Werd Trix : about patchwork poems & shaped poetics, via WWW, Mar. 27, 2014(A patchwork poem is just what its name says it is--something patched together. It is also called a cento, from the Latin for patchwork, and by some, a mosiac poem. It is a verse composed entirely of lines or phrases from the work of other authors. A patchwork poem can be rhymed or unrhymed; it can be assembled with emphasis on lines, or the lines might be chosen because they contain a focused concordance of a specific word. ... The cento evidently originated in ancient Greece; examples are found in Aristophanes's plays where lines have been usurped from Aeschylus and Homer. Roman poets, as early as the late second century, lifted lines from Virgil, as did the fourth century Latin poet Proba Falconia, ninth century Waldram, and seventeenth century Scottish poet Alexander Ross, writing in Latin. The earliest extant patchwork poem in English was published in 1775, written to celebrate Shakespeare's birthday. It was comprised of lines from Shakespeare's plays, though the author took liberal poetic license in changing the lines to suit his purpose.)
    • found: Poets.org, viewed Mar. 27, 2014(Poetic Form: Cento. From the Latin word for "patchwork," the cento (or collage poem) is a poetic form made up of lines from poems by other poets. Though poets often borrow lines from other writers and mix them in with their own, a true cento is composed entirely of lines from other sources. Early examples can be found in the work of Homer and Virgil. Modern centos are often witty, creating irony or humor from the juxtaposition of images and ideas. Two examples of contemporary centos are "The Dong with the Luminous Nose," by John Ashbery and Peter Gizzi's "Ode: Salute to the New York School." Ashbery's cento takes its title from the poem of the same name by Edward Lear and weaves together an unlikely array of voices, including Gerard Manley Hopkins, T.S. Eliot, and Lord Byron. Gizzi employed the form to create a collage of voices, as well as a bibliography, from the New York School poets.)
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  • Change Notes

    • 1986-02-11: new
    • 2014-06-13: revised
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