The Library of Congress > Linked Data Service > LC Subject Headings (LCSH)

Complex fluids


  • URI(s)

  • Variants

    • Complex liquids
    • Fluids, Complex
  • Broader Terms

  • Related Terms

  • Closely Matching Concepts from Other Schemes

  • Sources

    • found: Work cat.: 98-19940: Larson, R.G. The structure and rheology of complex fluids, c1998:CIP prelude (complex fluid: a substance that flows at modest stress (flow = smooth deformation on a humanly accessible time scale), distinguished from crystalline solids and simple liquids in that it usually possesses a molecular or structural scale much larger than atomic; includes polymeric liquids and melts, suspensions of colloidal particles, micellar solutions, liquid foams)
    • found: Encyc. phys. sci. tech.:v. 9, p. 121 (complex liquids: liquids consisting of molecules whose anisotropic shape, specific interactions, and intramolecular conformations determine their properties to a significant degree)
    • found: LC database, Apr. 8, 1998(complex fluids)
    • found: Sci. cit. index(complex fluids)
    • found: Word cat'd LCCN 2018035674: Introduction to soft matter physics, 2019:ECIP t.p. (soft matter physics) ch. 1 ("Soft matter" was introduced to describe something that goes plastic with soap bubbles, from gels, elastomers, liquid crystals, cosmetic creams, mud, ceramic paste, etc. Soft matters are usually called complex fluids in North America. Soft matters refer to the soft condensed matters : the materials other than those in gas and solid states, but usually not including simple fluids. From the point of view of materials, soft matter physics is concerned with physical principles governing the behaviors of foams, liquid crystals, polymers, colloidal dispersions, micro emulsion, micelle and various types of biological liquids, suspensions, and even granular materials, because of their wide applications)
    • found: Yale School of Engineering and Applied Science website, viewed Nov. 29, 2018(Soft Matter and Complex Fluids: Systems whose physical and mechanical properties are comparable to thermal energy at room temperature and thus easily deformed by thermal forces are considered soft materials. Examples include polymers, colloids, foams, or droplets in the form of suspensions, liquid crystals, gels, and glasses. Complex fluids refer to the subset of multi-component soft materials that can flow, but display non-Newtonian rheology. Lipid membranes, cytoskeletal protein gels, cell suspensions, and many other biological systems fit this description. Soft matter and complex fluids are ubiquitous in nature and have a number of important industrial applications)
    • notfound: Comprehensive dict. phys. chem.;Hackh chem. dict.;Hawley chem. dict.;Kirk-Othmer encyc. chem.;McGraw-Hill dict. sci. tech.
  • LC Classification

    • QD549.2.C66
  • Instance Of

  • Scheme Membership(s)

  • Collection Membership(s)

  • Change Notes

    • 1998-04-09: new
    • 2018-11-29: revised
  • Alternate Formats